Shenton Way



Shenton Way was named after Sir Shenton Whitelegge Thomas (b. 10 October 1879 d. 15 January 1962, London), Governor from 1934 to 1946.1 Built on reclaimed land that was part of the Telok Ayer reclamation project that was completed in 1932, the road was not officially opened until 1951. The Shenton Circus, a traffic-island roundabout that used to be at the Maxwell Road junction was a key landmark. The road was initially planned to be called Raffles Way but the decision was rescinded as there were many roads, institutions and places named after him. Shenton Way was so named in appreciation of Sir Shenton’s decision to remain in the colony during the invasion of Singapore by the Japanese in 1942. The road was officially opened by the Governor of Singapore Sir Franklin Gimson on 3 August 1951 at 10.30am.2

The original 27-metre wide road was built by Chief Municipal Engineer D. Wexton. However, by the early 1950s, traffic around Raffles Place had become congested and to relieve this situation, efforts were made to open Shenton Way up for redevelopment. Land lots between Shenton Way and Robinson Road were auctioned in the early 1952 for the construction of nine-storey offices and flats facing the sea.3

It was not till the 1960s that the first buildings appeared along Shenton Way. Among the first few were the Conference Hall and Trade Union House (1965) and now the Singapore Conference Hall, and the ICB Building (1968, which became the Shing Kwan House and currently the SGX Centre). In the 1970s buildings such as Robina House, UIC Building and Shenton House were built.4



Author

Vernon Cornelius



References
1. Savage, V. R., & Yeoh, B. S. A. (2013). Singapore street names: A study of typonomics. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 344. (Call no.: RSING 915.9570014 SAV-[TRA])
2. Savage, V. R., & Yeoh, B. S. A. (2013). Singapore street names: A study of typonomics. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 344. (Call no.: RSING 915.9570014 SAV-[TRA]); Shenton Way. (1951, July 20). The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
3. Savage, V. R., & Yeoh, B. S. A. (2013 ). Singapore street names: A study of typonomics. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 345. (Call no.: RSING 915.9570014 SAV-[TRA])
4. Tyers, R. K. (1993). Ray Tyers' Singapore: Then and now. Singapore: Landmark Books, pp. 280, 285. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 TYE-[HIS])



The information in this article is valid as at 1999 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

 

Subject
Street names--Singapore
Arts>>Architecture>>Public and commercial buildings
Streets and Places
Architecture and Landscape>>Streets and Places

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