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National Solidarity Party is formed 6th Mar 1987

The National Solidarity Party (NSP) is a Singapore political party that was formed following its official registration on 6 March 1987.[1] The founding president and secretary-general of the party were Kum Teng Hock and Soon Kia Seng respectively. Kum was a former member of the ruling People’s Action Party (PAP) while Soon was the ex-chairman of the Singapore Democratic Party.[2] The current president of the NSP is Sebastian Teo and the secretary-general is Jeannette Chong Aruldoss.[3]

According to its 1995 manifesto, the main political objective of the NSP was to organise and maintain a democratic movement that would ensure the solidarity and establishment of a just political system and standard of living. The party believed in a multi-party political system so that the rights and interests of the people could be proportionately represented.[4] The NSP also aimed to establish an open and freely competitive economic environment that would provide sufficient opportunities for local enterprises.[5] Today, the NSP continues to strive for these values. It continues to promote the establishment of a multi-party political system as well as a pro-business economic environment.[6]

The first election that the NSP contested was the 1988 parliamentary general election where it fielded eight candidates, but failed to capture any seats.[7]

References
1. National Solidarity Party. (1995). A society for all: Manifesto of the National Solidarity Party, 1995. Singapore: The Party. Call no.: RSING 324.25957 NAT.
2. New party celebrates N-Day with a dinner. (1987, August 28). The Straits Times, p. 14. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
3. National Solidarity Party. (2013). About. Retrieved January 20, 2014, from National Solidarity Party website: http://nsp.sg/about/
4. National Solidarity Party, 1995, pp. 49–54.
5. National Solidarity Party, 1995, pp. 55–58.
6. National Solidarity Party. (2013). Manifesto. Retrieved January 20, 2014, from National Solidarity Party website: http://nsp.sg/manifesto/
7. National Solidarity Party, 1995, p. 6; Fong, L. (1988, August 25). PAP challenged in 70 wards. The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

 

The information in this article is valid as at 2014 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

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