Othman Wok



Othman Wok (b. 8 October 1924, Singapore–d. 17 April 2017, Singapore) was a former politician who took on the social affairs (1963–77) and culture (1965–68) ministerial portfolios, as well as served as a People’s Action Party (PAP) member of parliament (MP) for the Pasir Panjang constituency (1963–81). Between 1977 and 1981, he was the ambassador to Indonesia while holding the appointment as a minister without portfolio before retiring from politics in 1981. Prior to his political career, Othman was a journalist with the Malay-language newspaper, Utusan Melayu. Considered an old guard of the PAP, Othman joined the party in 1954, in the early days of its formation.

Early life and education

Othman Wok was born to a teacher and school principal, Wok Ahmad, and his wife, Embon Mohamed, both of Orang Laut (sea gypsies) ancestry.1 His family descended from one of the few hundred families who were living in Singapore when Stamford Raffles arrived in 1819.2 For the first four years of his life, Othman lived at his uncle’s quarters with his parents and grandparents in the Telok Blangah area (off Kampong Bahru).3 During his childhood years, they moved several times as his father was posted to different schools. For a period of time in the 1930s, they lived on the island of Pulau Brani where his father taught.

At the age of five, Othman began his education at the Telok Blangah Malay School.4 While living on Pulau Brani, he attended the Sekolah Melayu Telok Saga (Telok Saga Malay School), and later Radin Mas English School before continuing his secondary education at Raffles Institution (1938–41).5 His father, Wok, chose the English medium for Othman despite the objection of Othman’s grandfather, who was afraid that with an English education, Othman might be converted to Christianity.6

During the Japanese Occupation (1942–45), Wok was worried that Othman might be forced to join the local Japanese army. Othman was thus reluctantly enrolled in a Japanese school, and soon became proficient in Japanese.7 During the war, Othman also worked as a laboratory assistant in a Japanese anti-plague laboratory and as a clerk at the Harbour Board.8

Early career as a journalist
Before joining Utusan Melayu as a clerk in October 1946, Othman was working as a radio technician on East Coast Road.9 After a week at the Utusan, one of the founders of the paper, Yusof Ishak (who later became Singapore’s first president), offered Othman a reporter position. Othman took up the offer, and after two years, he was posted to Kuala Lumpur to assist in the Utusan operations there.10 In 1950, Othman was selected by the company to take a diploma in journalism in London on the Colonial Development Scholarship.11 After a year in London, he returned to Malaya in August 1951 and was promoted to chief reporter of the Utusan, a post that brought him back to Singapore.12


Trade union work and friendship with Lee Kuan Yew
On his return to Singapore in 1951, Othman also became involved in the labour movement, and was elected as the secretary of the Singapore Printing Employees’ Union (SPEU). SPEU represented workers from local newspapers and publishing houses, but only a few of their members were journalists. When Othman was elected, he fought for higher wages and better working conditions for its members.13 In December 1953, Othman represented the Malaya Publishing House (better known as MPH) workers in their demand for higher wages.14 He was also in the centre of the Straits Times Press workers’ dispute that escalated into an illegal strike in February 1954.15 The strike failed, but it gave Othman the opportunity to work with Lee Kuan Yew who was then SPEU’s legal adviser and later became the first prime minister of Singapore. The two men had met earlier in 1952 when Lee negotiated for the Postal and Telecommunications Uniformed Staff Union, who was on a strike against the colonial government for better pay.16 When the strike ended in favour of the postal workers, Lee went to the Utusan’s office to ask the paper to publicise the case.17

Lee became the Utusan’s legal adviser in 1952 and often met Othman during Lee’s meetings with Yusof Ishak. When Yusof wanted to sue a Qalam magazine writer who had accused the Utusan of being leftist, Othman was roped in to translate some of the Utusan’s editorials.18 Othman also accompanied Yusof and Lee in 1955 when the Utusan was called by Tunku Abdul Rahman in Kuala Lumpur for carrying a negative report on the Tunku.19

Entry into politics
When the PAP was formed in 1954, Othman joined the party as he believed in its policy of multiracialism. During his early years with the PAP, Othman was involved in the party’s Malay Affairs Bureau meetings and the PAP publication, Petir. He also translated speeches into Malay for Lee. In 1959, Othman was invited to be the chairman of the Changi Geylang PAP branch, and was subsequently asked to stand for election in the Kampong Kembangan constituency.20


At a time when politics were fought along racial lines, Othman was sometimes seen as a traitor to the Malay community because he joined the PAP and not the Malay party, the United Malays National Organisation (UMNO). Othman lost in his first election in Kampong Kembangan as the residents were mostly supporters of UMNO. After the electoral defeat, he returned to work at the Utusan.21

Political career
The turbulent years leading to Singapore’s merger with the Federation of Malaya were also a disruptive time at the Utusan, whose major stakeholders comprised UMNO members.22 The management at the Utusan was reshuffled,23 leading to the departure of two senior staff: the deputy editor, A. Samad Ismail, was assigned to Jakarta in 1957, and Yusof Ishak left the paper in 1959.24 When the paper shifted its headquarters to Kuala Lumpur the following year,25 Othman was asked to remain in Singapore as the bureau chief.26

The Utusan’s woes continued as its editorial team grew more critical of the paper’s UMNO leadership. In 1961, Utusan staff staged a strike to protest against an UMNO takeover of the paper, threatening the paper’s closure.27 Othman, who did not participate in the strike, won the trust of the UMNO director who then instructed him to gather a new team from Singapore to restart the paper. Othman thus packed his bags for Kuala Lumpur to become the Utusan’s deputy editor.28

In September 1963 after Singapore’s merger with Malaya, Othman was asked to stand for election in the Pasir Panjang constituency.29 The 1963 election was held during a tense political climate in Singapore. The PAP was not only running against Barisan Sosialis, which was formed by the left-wing faction that had split from the PAP, but also against UMNO, which had a stronghold in the predominantly Malay constituencies.30 The Malay PAP candidates such as Othman, Rahmat Kenap, Rahim Ishak and Ya’acob Mohamed became labelled as traitors by Malay chauvinists.31 The PAP emerged victorious in UMNO’s strongholds of Geylang Serai, Kampong Kembangan and the Southern Islands.32 Othman also won in his constituency of Pasir Panjang, and thereafter resigned from the Utusan.33 After the election, Othman continued to receive threats and hate mail from the Malay non-supporters of PAP.34

Prime Minister Lee fielded Othman as the only Malay member in his new cabinet,35 and in October 1963, Othman Wok was appointed as Singapore’s first minister for home affairs and social welfare (known as minister for social affairs from November 1963 following the ministry’s renaming36) – a position he held until 1977.37 In August 1965, Othman took over the culture portfolio from S. Rajaratnam, and became minister for culture and social affairs when the two ministries merged shortly after the appointment.38 When the Ministry of Culture split from the merged entity in 1968,39 Jek Yeun Thong succeeded Othman as culture minister, while the latter retained his appointment as minister for social affairs.40 Othman was appointed as the ambassador to Indonesia in 1977 after relinquishing his social affairs portfolio, but continued as a minister without portfolio until his retirement from politics in 1981.41


Contributions
Social welfare
Othman’s social affairs portfolio covered a wide range of disadvantaged groups, from the disabled and the aged to wayward teenagers, working mothers and widows.42 He focused on stretching every dollar committed for welfare by introducing changes such as training residents in welfare homes to work so that they could contribute revenue to their facilities.43 He was also concerned with training social workers so that they could help in tackling problems pertaining to national development.44 In 1968, Othman initiated the incorporation of the Singapore Council of Social Service (present-day National Council of Social Service) in order to centralise and improve the administration of social work.45 The Volunteer Social Service Bureau was established in December 1976 to enlarge the pool of volunteers and improve their skillsets to cope with the demand of social welfare services. The bureau conducted training courses for volunteer social workers to equip them with the necessary skills for welfare services.46

Muslim affairs
Besides his ministerial appointment, Othman was also engaged in issues pertaining to Muslim affairs. He was involved in the long gestation and eventual implementation of the Administration of Muslim Law Act 1966. Under this landmark legislation in Singapore’s Muslim legal history, the Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura (MUIS; Singapore Islamic Religious Council) was constituted in 1968.47 Othman considers the establishment of MUIS, the central body that administrates Muslim affairs in Singapore, as one of his greatest contributions to the Muslim community.48 In response to the community’s agitation for mosques to be built within their estates, Othman, together with Lee and other Malay MPs, implemented the Mosque Building Fund (MBF) in May 1975. The MBF allowed Muslims to make voluntary contributions from their Central Provident Fund towards the building of mosques in Singapore.49 Othman also introduced compulsory registration of Haj pilgrims to provide them with medical and welfare services, and getting MUIS to charter flights to and from Mecca for the pilgrims.50

National sports development
Under Othman’s charge, a sports department was set up within the ministry of Culture and Social Affairs in 1966, and one of its tasks was to manage the Singapore Grand Prix.51 He also saw to the construction of the National Stadium which began in December 1966,52 and officially opened on 21 July 1973.53 In addition, Othman chaired the National Sports Promotion Board set up in 1971 to streamline the administration of national sports programmes54 and championed the drive to involve the masses in sports through the “Sports for All” programme run by the board.55


Retirement
After his retirement from politics, Othman was a board member of bodies such as the Singapore Tourist Promotion Board and the Sentosa Development Corporation,56 and a director of several companies.57 He was awarded the Anugerah Tokoh Wartawan Dunia Melayu in 2008 by the Persatuan Bekas Wartawan Berita Harian Malaysia (Former Berita Harian Malaysia Journalists Association) in recognition of his 20 years of contribution to Malay journalism.58


Fiction-writing career
Othman had enjoyed writing fiction ever since he was a young boy. As a student at Raffles Institution, he contributed short stories to his school magazines.59 He developed an interest in writing ghost and horror stories during his childhood after listening to the tales the adults told about the supernatural world. While working as a journalist, Othman produced a series of short horror stories for Utusan Melayu and magazines such as Mastika.60

After retiring from politics in 1981, Othman was able to devote more time to writing, and became a regular writer of horror tales for a Malaysian weekend newspaper, Mingguan Malaysia.61 He published his biography, Never in My Wildest Dreams, in 2000, a project he agreed to in 1994 at the suggestion of his daughter, Lily.62 Othman also began compiling the short stories that he had written for various newspapers and magazines.63 Some of his short story collections include Malayan Horror: Macabre Tales from Singapore and Malaya (1991),64 Kisah-kisah Seram dan Misteri (1995)65 and Unseen Occupants and Other Chilling Tales (2006).66

Death
Othman passed away on 17 April 2017 at the age of 92.67

Family
Parents: Wok Ahmad and Embon Mohamad.
Wives: Cik Dah Mohd Noor68 (m. 1949; d. 9 December 198769); Lina Abdullah (m. 1975).
Children: Four daughters, Saffiah, Dahlia, Lily and Diana.70

Timeline
1946–Sep 1963: Reporter and later deputy editor, Utusan Melayu.
1961–1963: Deputy editor, Utusan Melayu (Kuala Lumpur).
1950–51: Gains a diploma in journalism from London School of Journalism (London Polytechnic).
1951: Elected as secretary-general of SPEU.

1954: Joins PAP.71
Sep 1963–Jan 1981: Member of parliament, Pasir Panjang.72
19 Oct 1963–30 Jun 1977: Minister for social affairs73 (originally known as minister for home affairs and social welfare until the ministry was renamed in November 1963).74
Aug 1965–Apr 1968: Minister for culture and social affairs.75
1 Jul 1977–May 1981: Ambassador to Indonesia.76
1 Jul 1977–5 Jan 1981: Minister without portfolio.77
2 Mar 1981: Permanent member, Presidential Council of Minority Rights.78
1981–94: Board member, Singapore Tourist Promotion Board.79
1981–97: Board member, Sentosa Development Corporation.80

Selected bibliography
1991:
 Malayan Horror: Macabre Tales of Singapore and Malaysia in the 50s.81

1993: Cerita-cerita Seram (selected stories from Malayan Horror translated into Malay by Lily).82
1995: Kisah-kisah Seram & Misteri.83
2000: Never in My Wildest Dreams.84
2002: Tales of Horror and Mystery: More Macabre Tales from Singapore, Malaya and Indonesia.85
2004: Malayan Horror: Macabre Tales from Singapore and Malaya.86
2006: The Disused Well: And Other Tales of Horror & Mystery (English edition of Kisah-kisah Seram & Misteri).87
2006: Unseen Occupants and Other Chilling Tales.88

Honours
1980:
Jasa Utama Star, Indonesia.89

1990: Order of Nila Utama (Second Class).90
2008: Anugerah Tokoh Wartawan Dunia Melayu.91



Authors

Nor-Afidah Abd Rahman, Marsita Omar and Kartini Saparudin




References
1. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 1–5. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH); Page 23 advertisements column 1. (1986, August 20). The Straits Times, p. 23. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
2. Potret keluarga. (2007, February 22). Berita Harian, p. 10; Mantan menteri sumbang artifak kepada muzium Taman Warisan. (2007, March 31). Berita Harian, p. 3; Kisah hidup Othman Wok. (2001, April 21). Berita Harian, p. 18. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
3. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 11–12. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH); The story of S’pores race relations as seen through the eyes of Othman Wok. (1997, January 25). The Straits Times, p. 44. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
4. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 13–14. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
5. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 14–15. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH); Khalid Khamis. (2002, December 23). Pertemuan penuh nostalgia. Berita Harian, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
6. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 32. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
7. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 32, 56–57. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
8. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 58–60. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH); Phan, M. Y. (1993, October 22). Tampoi lab may not be first in S-E Asia. The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
9. Tegas dalam soal kerja. (2000, November 23). Berita Harian, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
10. Chandy, G. (2000, April 23). Once an MP, now he’s a ‘JC’. The New Paper, p. 4; Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 87–88. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
11.Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 103–105. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
12. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 112. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
13. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 113, 115. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
14. Strike notice mystery. (1953, December 8). The Straits Times, p. 7; A demand, then a request. (1954, January 15). The Straits Times, p. 5; Printing Employees’ Union issues statement. (1954, January 12). The Straits Times, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
15. No developments in press walk-out. (1954, February 9). The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 115–116. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
16. Postmen reject offer. (1952, May 19). The Straits Times, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
17. Postmen’s strike is now over. (1952, May 29). The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
18. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 118–119. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
19. Zainuddin Maidin. (2013). Di depan api di belakang duri: Kisah sejarah Utusan Melayu. Kuala Lumpur: Utusan Publications, pp. 68–69. (Call no.: RSEA 079.595 ZAI)
20. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 120, 124–126. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
21. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 128, 137. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
22. Zainuddin Maidin. (2013). Di depan api di belakang duri: Kisah sejarah Utusan Melayu. Kuala Lumpur: Utusan Publications, p. 113. (Call no.: RSEA 079.595 ZAI)
23. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 135. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
24. Zainuddin Maidin. (2013). Di depan api di belakang duri: Kisah sejarah Utusan Melayu. Kuala Lumpur: Utusan Publications, p. 167. (Call no.: RSEA 079.595 ZAI); Chew, M. (1996). Leaders of Singapore. Singapore: Resource Press, p. 182. (Call no.: RSING q920.05957 CHE)
25. Utusan Malaysia. (2015). History Utusan. Retrieved from Utusan website: http://aboututusan.com/HISTORY.html
26. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 138–139, 142–144. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
27. Utusan Melayu staff on strike. (1961, July 21). The Straits Times, p. 18. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
28. Zainuddin Maidin. (2013). Di depan api di belakang duri: Kisah sejarah Utusan Melayu. Kuala Lumpur: Utusan Publications, pp. 113–115. (Call no.: RSEA 079.595 ZAI); Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 148. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
29. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 162. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
30. PAP landslide: Barisan is hammered. (1963, September 22). The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; PM reminisces about Rahmat Kenap. (1999, March 14). The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
31. The magnificent 24. (1977, February 24). New Nation, p. 1; Ahmad Osman. (1999, March 13). He had risked his life for multi-racialism. The Straits Times, p. 51; Zuraidah Ibrahim. (1998, September 18). The night SM’s tears moved the guests. The Straits Times, p. 49. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
32. PAP landslide: Barisan is hammered. (1963, September 22). The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
33. This is the way the voting went. (1963, September 22). The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 164–165. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
34. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 174–175. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
35. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 165. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
36. Ministry of Social Affairs. (1963, November 29). The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
37. Dr. Toh takes on social affairs. (1977, July 1). New Nation, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
38. Wok takes over culture. (1965, August 12). The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
39. Ministry of Social and Family Development. (2014, July 30). Our organisation: History & milestones. Retrieved from Ministry of Social and Family Development website: http://app.msf.gov.sg/About-MSF/Our-Organisation/History-Milestones
40. Prime Minister’s Office. (1968, April 15). Statement from Prime Minister’s Office [Press release]. Retrieved from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline
41. Ministry of Foreign Affairs. (1977, May 20). Encik Othman Wok appointed as Singapore ambassador to the Republic of Indonesia [Press release]. Retrieved from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline; Government of Singapore. (1981, January 5). Government press statement. Retrieved from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline
42. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 190. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH); Aid to aged, widows: No increase, MP told. (1966, December 17). The Straits Times, p. 17. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; S’pore govt makes changes in portfolios. (1963, December 9). The Straits Times, p. 6. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
43. Singapore. Parliament. Parliamentary debates: Official report. (1972, March 13). Debate on president’s address (Vol. 27). Singapore: [s.n.], cols. 219–222. (Call no.: RCLOS 328.5957 SIN)
44. No pat on back. (1973, January 25). New Nation, p. 11. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
45. Singapore. Parliament. Parliamentary debates: Official report. (1968, May 22). Second reading of Singapore Council of Social Service Bill (Vol. 27). Singapore: [s.n.], cols. 398–404. (Call no.: RCLOS 328.5957 SIN); Singapore. Parliament. Parliamentary debates: Official report. (1968, December 3). Third reading of Council of Social Service Bill (Vol. 28). Singapore: [s.n.], cols. 63–65. (Call no.: RCLOS 328.5957 SIN)
46. Othman to launch joint social service bureau. (1976, December 9). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Community service. (1977, March 9). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
47. Muslim Law bill is passed in Parliament. (1966, August 18). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; A Muslim council. (1967, June 26). The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
48. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 197. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
49. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, pp. 198–199. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH); Mosques for 4 new towns in 3 to 8 years. (1975, August 20). The Straits Times, p. 9. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
50. Mecca: Govt to handle all flights for pilgrims. (1976, March 3). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Mosque: Those who want to give more. (1975, May 26). The Straits Times, p. 20. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
51. Earnest, F. (1966, April 20). Sports dept will begin operation mid-year. The Straits Times, p. 18. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
52. Work begins on complex. (1966, December 7). The Straits Times, p. 20. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
53. $1 million gift. (1973, July 22). The Straits Times, p. 6. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Flash of colour greeting for Lee. (1973, July 21). The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
54. National Sports Promotion Board. (1972). Annual report 1971. Singapore: National Sports Promotion Board, p. 1. (Call no.: RCLOS 354.5957093 NSPBSA); Earnest, F. (1971, January 19). Big move into Sports HQ begins. The Straits Times, p. 26. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
55. Wok opens drive to take sports to all. (1971, November 23). The Straits Times, p. 24. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; NSPB has done a good job as promoters. (1972, December 30). The Straits Times, p. 28. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
56. Presidential Council for Minority Rights. (2005). Annual report, p. 1. Retrieved from Parliament of Singapore website: http://www.parliament.gov.sg/lib/sites/default/files/paperpresented/pdf/2015/Cmd.%201%20of%202015_0.pdf; Setelah jawatan2 penting politik ditinggalkan. (1981, May 7). Berita Harian, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
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58. Soraya Salim. (2008, January 19). Dua veteran terima anugerah kewartanan. Berita Harian, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
59. Ex-minister has more time for his writing. (1985, February 10). The Straits Times, p. 21. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
60. Labour of love. (1991, August 26). The Straits Times, p. 9. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Horror tales retold. (1991, August 26). The Straits Times, p. 9. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
61. Ex-minister has more time for his writing. (1985, February 10). The Straits Times, p. 21. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
62. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, [n.p., ‘Acknowledgements’]. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
63. Labour of love. (1991, August 26). The Straits Times, p. 9. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
64. Othman Wok. (1991). Malayan horror: Macabre tales of Singapore and Malaya in the 50s. Singapore: Heinemann Asia. (Call no.: RSING 899.283 OTH)
65. Othman Wok. (1995). Kisah-kisah seram & misteri. Singapore: Heinemann Asia. (Call no.: RSING Malay 899.2305 OTH)
66. Othman Wok. (2006). Unseen occupants and other chilling tales. Singapore: Horizon Books. (Call no.: RSING 823 OTH)
67. Othman Wok, member of independent Singapore's first cabinet, dies aged 92. (2017, April 17). The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva.
68. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 74. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
69. Othman Wok’s wife dies of cancer. (1987, December 10). The Straits Times, p. 40. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
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71. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles, p. 48, 87–88, 103, 113, 120. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
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73. Co-operation pledge by Premier Lee. (1963, October 20). The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Dr. Toh takes on social affairs. (1977, July 10). New Nation, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
74. Ministry of Social Affairs. (1963, November 29). The Straits Times, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
75. Wok takes over culture. (1965, August 12). The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Prime Minister’s Office. (1968, April 15). Statement from Prime Minister’s Office [Press release]. Retrieved from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline
76. Othman leaves for Jakarta posting. (1977, July 1). The Straits Times, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Conceicao for Indonesia. (1981, May 3). New Nation, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
77. Dr. Toh takes on social affairs. (1977, July 10). New Nation, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Ministry of Foreign Affairs. (1977, May 20). Encik Othman Wok appointed as Singapore ambassador to the Republic of Indonesia [Press release]. Retrieved from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline; Government of Singapore. (1981, January 5). Government press statement. Retrieved from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline
78. Presidential Council for Minority Rights. (2005). Annual report, p. 1. Retrieved from Parliament of Singapore website: http://www.parliament.gov.sg/lib/sites/default/files/paperpresented/pdf/2015/Cmd.%201%20of%202015_0.pdf
79. Setelah jawatan2 penting politik ditinggalkan... (1981, May 7). Berita Harian, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Chandy, G. (2000, April 23). Once an MP, now he’s a ‘JC’. The New Paper, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
80. Chandy, G. (2000, April 23). Once an MP, now he’s a ‘JC’. The New Paper, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Setelah jawatan2 penting politik ditinggalkan. (1981, May 7). Berita Harian, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
81. Othman Wok. (1991). Malayan horror: Macabre tales of Singapore and Malaya in the 50s. Singapore: Heinemann Asia. (Call no.: RSING 899.283 OTH)
82. Othman Wok & Lily Othman (Trans.). (1993). Cerita-cerita Seram. Singapore: Heinemann Asia. (Call no.: RSING Malay 899.2305 OTH); Tan, G. E. (1993, August 21). For kitchen, classrooms, horror fans and kids. New Straits Times, p. 28. Retrieved from Factiva.
83. Othman Wok. (1995). Kisah-kisah seram & misteri. Singapore: Heinemann Asia. (Call no.: RSING Malay 899.2305 OTH)
84. Othman Wok. (2000). Never in my wildest dreams. Singapore: Raffles. (Call no.: RSING 324.259570092 OTH)
85. Othman Wok, & Lily Othman (Ed.). (2002). Tales of Horror and Mystery: More Macabre Tales from Singapore, Malaya and Indonesia. Singapore: Horizon Books. (Call no.: RSING 899.28 OTH)
86. Othman Wok. (2004). Malayan horror: Macabre tales from Singapore and Malaya. Singapore: Horizon Books. (Call no.: RSING 899.283 OTH)
87. Othman Wok. (2006). The disused well: And other tales of horror & mystery. Singapore: Horizon Books. (Call no.: RSING 899.283 OTH)
88. Othman Wok. (2006). Unseen occupants and other chilling tales. Singapore: Horizon Books. (Call no.: RSING 823 OTH)
89. Low, K. T. (Ed.). (2003). Who’s who in Singapore. Singapore: Who’s Who Pub., p. 320. (Call no.: RSING 920.05957 WHO)
90. Halaman 3 iklan ruangan 1. (1990, August 22). Berita Harian, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
91. Soraya Salim. (2008, January 19). Dua veteran terima anugerah kewartawanan. Berita Harian, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.



The information in this article is valid as at 17 April 2017 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

Subject
Award winners--Singapore--Biography
Politics and Government
Law and government>>Political process>>Leadership
Othman Wok, 1924-
Personalities
Politicians--Singapore--Biography
Personalities>>Biographies>>Political Leaders

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