Pan Shou



Pan Shou (潘受) (D. Litt) (b. 26 January 1911, Quanzhou, Fujian, China1–d. 23 February 1999, Singapore2) was a noted Chinese calligrapher and poet. In addition to his artistic pursuits, Pan had also worked in other roles, from newspaper editor to bank manager.3 He was the founding secretary-general of Nanyang University.4

Early life
Pan was born to a Qing-dynasty scholar in 1911, a turbulent year that saw the end of the Chinese Qing dynasty.5 Despite completing his formal education at age 18 and lacking a university degree, he held a position as a teacher at the Westminster school in Quanzhou, Fujian province.6 He left home for Singapore in 1929, at the age of 19.7


Career
In search of a journalistic career before launching into a vocation in education, Pan became the deputy editor of the newspaper Lat Pau’s literary supplement in 1930.8 The paper was Singapore’s first Chinese daily, published from 1837 to 1932. Barely a year into his job, however, an opening for the position of principal in Chong Zheng Primary School (also known as Chung Cheng School or Chong Cheng Primary School), located on Beach Road, caught his eye.9 Urged by Chinese teacher-friends in Indonesia who sought to teach in Singapore, he went for the interview and caught the eye of a member of the board of governors, Lee Kong Chian, and clinched the position.10

Pan’s career in education brought him back to China in 1931 for a teaching stint in Shanghai, where he again witnessed tensions between the Nationalists and Communists.11 However, his father’s illness brought him back to his hometown in Fujian.12 Upon his father’s demise, Pan returned to Singapore to teach at Chinese High School, soon after student protests had led to the school’s reorganisation under Lee Kong Chian’s chairmanship. In 1934, Pan became the principal of Tao Nan Primary School, nurturing it into a premier institution.13 During this time he met Tan Kah Kee.14 In 1940, he began a two-year principalship in Muar, Malaya, before the outbreak of World War II disrupted his teaching career.15

The war years saw Pan escaping with his family, travelling first to Bombay in India, then China.16 He returned after the war, setting up a trading business. On top of this, he was often asked by Tan Kah Kee, Lee Kong Chian and Tan Lark Sye to help draft important press announcements. He was also invited to join the Hokkien Huay Kuan.17

As early as 1949, with the University of Malaya’s decision to start a Chinese studies department, Tan Lark Sye had contributed $500,000 to the project. However, no such department was ever started.18 Tan then proceeded with plans for a Chinese University, which eventually became Nanyang University (also known as “Nantah”).19 The discussions concerning the university, and involving Tan Lark Sye, Tan Kah Kee and other prominent Hokkien businessmen, invariably drew Pan into the fold. He designed the three-ringed logo of the school, which was originally drawn by his daughter, Xiao Fen. The three rings represent three races – Malay, Chinese and Indian – with the star in the centre reflecting the university’s role in serving the three races.20

When Nantah’s first vice-chancellor, Lin Yutang, resigned suddenly because of differences with the main committee, Pan was asked to become the secretary-general and ensure that the buildings were completed and lecturers in place, before the university’s opening on 15 March 1956.21 He took on the role in April 1955, and remained in the position until the first batch of students graduated in 1959. He then resigned, leaving the campus in February 1960.22 Unfortunately, the university’s alleged links with communism and Chinese chauvinism cost Pan his citizenship, which was retracted by the government in 1958.23

Artistic pursuits
After retirement, Pan devoted himself to calligraphy and poetry.24 This hobby, which ultimately became his passion, made him world-famous.25 He had practised calligraphy since he was eight, beginning with kaishu, the regular script used by the great Tang calligraphers.26 It was only in the last 25 years of his life that he began to focus on the xingshu script.27 Influenced by He Shaoji, a noted Qing dynasty scholar and calligrapher, Pan was also remarkable as a poet.28

Poetry
By the tender age of 12, Pan’s gift in Chinese literature was recognised by the Quanzhou scholar, Lim Chong He.29

Published poetry collections
1980: Pan Shou & Calligraphy: Poetry of the South30
1970: Pavilion Beyond the Ocean31
1984: Pan Shou Nanyuan Poetry Collection32
1991: Pan Shou at 80: An Exhibition of Pan Shou’s Calligraphy & Poetry33

1997: Pan Shou Shi Ji34

The final anthology contains approximately 1,200 poems written by Pan in various classical formats over 60 years, between 1937 and 1997. This coincided with the period spanning Japan’s invasion of China and Hong Kong’s return to China after 155 years of British rule.35

Calligraphy
Pan’s calligraphic style is said to be so unique that, according to some, a “Pan style” of calligraphy has emerged.36 Pan provided calligraphy for a number of organisations and institutions in Singapore and China. These include:37

(1) The Chinese character for lion, shi, which he donated to the Singapore Art Museum.38
(2) A poem in Tang dynasty-style verse comprising seven-character phrases, which he donated to the Esplanade – Theatres on the Bay.39
(3) The name of the former Ministry of Information and the Arts in Chinese, created in conjunction with its move to revamped premises at the Old Hill Street Police Station in late 1999.40
(4) Chinese characters for the Chinese Heritage Centre in Jurong.41
(5) Chinese characters on the masthead of the Chinese daily, Lianhe Zaobao.42

Pan’s works are also on permanent display in China, in places such as the Confucius Temple in Qufu,43 the Stele Forest Museum in Xi’an,44 on the honorific arch marking the beginning of the ancient Maritime Silk Road in Quanzhou,45 on the Yellow Crane Tower in Wuhan46 and in the museum of the Great Wall of China. Rubbings of his inscription in xingshu style mark the archway to his native hometown in Quanzhou.47

Collection of Chinese Calligraphy, a three-volume compilation of Pan’s works, was published in 1982. Two exhibitions of his works were held in 1984 and in 1991 at the National Museum of Singapore.48

Pan had also been the honorary adviser of the Chinese Calligraphy Society of Singapore since 1977.49

Death
Pan died of pneumonia at Mount Elizabeth Hospital just weeks after his 88th birthday, leaving behind his second wife, two children, four grandchildren and a great-grandchild.50 His ashes were placed at the columbarium at the All Saints Chapel off Upper Serangoon Road.51

Awards
1928: First prize (at age 17) for his entry, “On The Campaign for Anti-Drug Use Movement”, in the National Essay Competition.52 The selection committee was headed by Cai Yuan Pei, former president of Peking University (1917–19).53
1985: Gold medal at the Salon Artists Francais, France.54
1987: Cultural Medallion for excellence in calligraphy, Singapore.55
1991: Officier des Art et des Lettres, France.56
1994: Meritorious Service Medal, for excellence in calligraphy, Singapore.57
1997: ASEAN Cultural Medal during ASEAN’s 30th anniversary in Jakarta, Indonesia, in recognition of Pan’s outstanding service in promoting art and culture in this region.58

Family
Wife: Pan’s first wife was Chen Er Fen (b. 1913–d. 26 June 1937). They were married in 1933 when he was 22 and she was 20 despite objections from his parents, who had prepared an arranged marriage for him.59 They had been childhood sweethearts while he was studying at Pei Yuan High School and she at the sister school, Pei Ying High School, in their hometown in Quanzhou. She died at age 24 of cancer in 1937, a few months after arriving in Singapore.60 She bore him two children – Soo Yeng and Xiao Fen.61 Pan wrote at least four poems about her.62

After his first wife’s death, he married Chen Boon Hwee (b. 1911?–), Er Fen’s elder sister.63 Pan married her at Er Fen’s request prior to her death, to ensure that the children would continue to be cared for. Boon Hwee was a Chinese teacher in Singapore when Pan married her.64 She lives in Perth, Australia.65

Son: Soo Yeng, a gynaecologist.66
Daughter: Xiao Fen, a businesswoman.67



Author

Bonny Tan



References
1. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou dies of pneumonia. The Straits Times, p. 1; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou celebrated his 88th birthday weeks ago. The Straits Times, p. 36. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
2. Bidding Pan Shou a final farewell. (1999, February 27). The Straits Times, p. 40; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou dies of pneumonia. The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
3. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou celebrated his 88th birthday weeks ago. The Straits Times, p. 36; Leong, W. K. (1994, August 14). Pan Shou’s other face. The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
4. Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
5. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou celebrated his 88th birthday weeks ago. The Straits Times, p. 36; Leong, W. K. (1994, August 14). Pan Shou’s other face. The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
6. Pan, S. Y. (1997, August 18). Remembering Pan Shou: Poet, philosopher, scholar, gentleman. The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
7. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou dies of pneumonia. The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
8. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Leong, W. K. (1994, August 14). Pan Shou’s other face. The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
9. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Leong, W. K. (1994, August 14). Pan Shou’s other face. The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/; Purushothaman, V. (Ed.). (2002). Narratives: Notes on a cultural journey: Cultural medallion recipients 1979–2001. Singapore: National Arts Council, p. 182. (Call no.: RSING 700.95957 NAR)
10. Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
11. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/

12. Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/

13. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/

14. Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/

15. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
16. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
17. Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/

18. Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/

19. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou dies of pneumonia. The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/; Purushothaman, V. (Ed.). (2002). Narratives: Notes on a cultural journey: Cultural medallion recipients 1979–2001. Singapore: National Arts Council, p. 182. (Call no.: RSING 700.95957 NAR)
20. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
21. Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/; Purushothaman, V. (Ed.). (2002). Narratives: Notes on a cultural journey: Cultural medallion recipients 1979–2001. Singapore: National Arts Council, p. 182. (Call no.: RSING 700.95957 NAR)
22. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/; Purushothaman, V. (Ed.). (2002). Narratives: Notes on a cultural journey: Cultural medallion recipients 1979–2001. Singapore: National Arts Council, p. 182. (Call no.: RSING 700.95957 NAR); The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 12. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET)
23. Pang, C. L. (1996, November 28). He was there when Nantah needed a head – Pan Shou’s pivotal role in University’s startup. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
24. Purushothaman, V. (Ed.). (2002). Narratives: Notes on a cultural journey: Cultural medallion recipients 1979–2001. Singapore: National Arts Council, p. 182. (Call no.: RSING 700.95957 NAR)
25. Leong, W. K. (1994, August 14). Pan Shou’s other face. The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
26. Calligraphy is like taiqi. (1994, August 14). The Straits Times, p. 5; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Purushothaman, V. (Ed.). (2002). Narratives: Notes on a cultural journey: Cultural medallion recipients 1979–2001. Singapore: National Arts Council, p. 182. (Call no.: RSING 700.95957 NAR); The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 13. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET)
27. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Purushothaman, V. (Ed.). (2002). Narratives: Notes on a cultural journey: Cultural medallion recipients 1979–2001. Singapore: National Arts Council, p. 182. (Call no.: RSING 700.95957 NAR); The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 13. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET)
28. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
29. Pan, S. Y. (1997, August 18). Remembering Pan Shou: Poet, philosopher, scholar, gentleman. The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
30. 潘受 [Pan, S.]. (1980). 潘受行书南国诗册 [The collection of Chinese calligraphy by Pan Shou] 华书学研究会: 新加坡国家博物院 [Singapore: Chinese Calligraphy Society of Singapore; National Museum of Singapore]. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 PS)
31. Pan, S. (1985). 《海外庐诗》 [Hai wai lu shi]. Singapore: Singapore Cultural Studies. (Call no.: Chinese RSING C811 PS)
32. The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 7. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET)
33. Pan, S. (1991). Pan Shou at 80: An exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy & poetry. Singapore: The Museum. (Call no.: RSING 745.619951 PAN)
34. Pan, S. Y. (1997, August 18). Remembering Pan Shou: Poet, philosopher, scholar, gentleman. The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
35. Pan, S. (1997). 《潘受诗集》 [Pan shou shi ji]. Singapore: Xinjiapo wenhua xueshi xiehui. (Call no.: Chinese RSING C811 PS)
36. Neo, H. M. (2002, December 8). Push for a trust to preserve historic homes. The Straits Times, p. 22. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
37. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
38. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Where some of his works are located. (1999, February 25). The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
39. The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 47. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET); Where some of his works are located. (1999, February 25). The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
40. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Where some of his works are located. (1999, February 25). The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
41. Where some of his works are located. (1999, February 25). The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
42. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 25). The legacy of Pan Shou. The Straits Times, p. 30; Where some of his works are located. (1999, February 25). The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
43. Nanyang Calligraphy Centre. (2009, January 1). Pan Shou [Weblog post]. Retrieved 2016, November 29 from Zhonghua shufa Chinese Calligraphy website: http://icalligraphy.blogspot.sg/2009/01/pan-shou.html; The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 7. (Call no.: Chinese 745.619951 RET)
44. Chu zi pan Shou shou ji. (2007, June 1). Nanyang shang bo [Nanyang Business Daily]. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/; Nanyang Calligraphy Centre. (2009, January 1). Pan Shou [Weblog post]. Retrieved 2016, November 29 from Zhonghua shufa Chinese Calligraphy website: http://icalligraphy.blogspot.sg/2009/01/pan-shou.html
45. Nanyang Calligraphy Centre. (2009, January 1). Pan Shou [Weblog post]. Retrieved 2016, November 29 from Zhonghua shufa Chinese Calligraphy website: http://icalligraphy.blogspot.sg/2009/01/pan-shou.html
46. Chu zi pan shou shou ji. (2007, June 1). Nan yang shang bo [Nanyang Business Daily]. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/; Nanyang Calligraphy Centre. (2009, January 1). Pan Shou [Weblog post]. Retrieved 2016, November 29 from Zhonghua shufa Chinese Calligraphy website: http://icalligraphy.blogspot.sg/2009/01/pan-shou.html
47. Nanyang Calligraphy Centre. (2009, January 1). Pan Shou [Weblog post]. Retrieved 2016, November 29 from Zhonghua shufa Chinese Calligraphy website: http://icalligraphy.blogspot.sg/2009/01/pan-shou.html; The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 68. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET); Where some of his works are located. (1999, February 25). The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
48. The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 7. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET)
49. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou celebrated his 88th birthday weeks ago. The Straits Times, p. 36. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
50. Bidding Pan Shou a final farewell. (1999, February 27). The Straits Times, p. 40; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou dies of pneumonia. The Straits Times, p. 1; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou celebrated his 88th birthday weeks ago. The Straits Times, p. 36. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
51. Bidding Pan Shou a final farewell. (1999, February 27). The Straits Times, p. 40. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
52. Pan, S. Y. (1997, August 18). Remembering Pan Shou: Poet, philosopher, scholar, gentleman. The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
53. Schwarcz, V. (1986). The Chinese enlightenment: Intellectuals and the legacy of the May Fourth movement of 1919. Berkeley: University of California Press, p. 46. (Call no.: R 951.04 SCH); The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 11. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET)
54. The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET)
55. Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou dies of pneumonia. The Straits Times, p. 1; Leong, W. K. (1994, August 14). Pan Shou’s other face. The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
56. Pan, S. Y. (1997, August 18). Remembering Pan Shou: Poet, philosopher, scholar, gentleman. The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
57. Dedication and teamwork. (1994, August 9). The Straits Times, p. 15; Leong, W. K. (1999, February 24). Pan Shou dies of pneumonia. The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; The retrospective exhibition of Pan Shou’s calligraphy and poetry. (1995). Singapore: National Arts Council & National Heritage Board, p. 4. (Call no.: Chinese RSING 745.619951 RET)
58. Pan, S. Y. (1997, August 18). Remembering Pan Shou: Poet, philosopher, scholar, gentleman. The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
59. Bidding Pan Shou a final farewell. (1999, February 27). The Straits Times, p. 40; Leong, W. K. (1999, March 7). Search for ashes of Pan Shou’s first wife. The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
60. Leong, W. K. (1999, March 7). Search for ashes of Pan Shou’s first wife. The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
61. Bidding Pan Shou a final farewell. (1999, February 27). The Straits Times, p. 40; Leong, W. K. (1999, March 7). Search for ashes of Pan Shou’s first wife. The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
62. Leong, W. K. (1999, March 7). Search for ashes of Pan Shou’s first wife. The Straits Times, p. 31. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
63. Bidding Pan Shou a final farewell. (1999, February 27). The Straits Times, p. 40. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
64. Leong, W. K. (1999, March 7). Search for ashes of Pan Shou’s first wife. The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
65. Bidding Pan Shou a final farewell. (1999, February 27). The Straits Times, p. 40. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
66. Bidding Pan Shou a final farewell. (1999, February 27). The Straits Times, p. 40. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
67. Calligraphy is like taiqi. (1994, August 14). The Straits Times, p. 5; Bidding Pan Shou a final farewell. (1999, February 27). The Straits Times, p. 40. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.



The information in this article is valid as at 2017 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic. 

Subject
Personalities>>Biographies>>Artists
Artists
Arts--Singapore
Poets--Singapore--Biography
Calligraphy, Chinese--Singapore
Calligraphers--Singapore--Biography
Pan Shou, 1911-1999
Arts>>Decorative arts>>Calligraphy