Kranji Road



Kranji Road is a two-way road that begins at the junction of Woodlands Road and Turf Club Avenue, and ends near Kranji Loop. The road is named after a local tree, the pokok keranji (Malay for kranji or keranji tree) or the Dialium indum, which was found in abundance in the first half of the 19th century, but has since rapidly dwindled.1

Description
Kranji Road falls within the Sungei Kadut Planning Area in the northern region of Singapore. The planning area is bounded by Bukit Timah Expressway to the east, Straits of Johor to the north, Kranji Expressway to the south and Pang Sua Canal/Kranji Reservoir to the west.2

Kranji Road is an industrial area, and amenities found there include Ji Li Eating House,3 Kranji Medical Clinic Pte. Ltd., and AJ Supermart, a 24/7 convenience store, and Kranji Lodge 1, a foreign workers dormitory.4

In 2015, two brown directional signs endorsed and approved by the Singapore Tourism Board and Land Transport Authority were also put up along Kranji Road and Jalan Bahar to identify farms in the Kranji countryside as points of interest for tourists.5

In addition, the Kranji Bus Depot owned by SMRT is also located at Kranji Road.6 It is a repair and maintenance centre for buses, taxis and external fleet owners, offering a diverse range of services, including repair and maintenance packages, accident repair, spray painting and motor insurance claims.7

According to a map of Singapore dating back to 1970, a village called Kampong Kranji used to exist beside Kranji Road.8 Located along the northern coast, it was a significant spot that served as a ferry station to Johor Bahru before the Causeway was built in 1923. Kampong Kranji attracted many Chinese traders because it was linked to Singapore Town by Bukit Timah Road.9 In addition, Kranji Road was once home to Tao Khoon Public School, a Chinese-language10 school that was originally a private institution run by the community leaders of the area before it received government grant-in-aid.11 The school was one of the polling stations for the residents of Choa Chu Kang during the general elections of 1963 and 1972.12

History
The area around Kranji Road was used for the first Singapore-Kranji railway from Tank Road to Kranji, which opened in 1903.13 The track line crossed Kranji Road near the 14th mile, although the train itself did not stop at Kranji. In fact, a 1903 article by The Straits Times notes: “As regards the title “Singapore-Kranji” Railway, it does seem anomalous that the line not only does not go to Kranji, but that it is virtually impossible to get to Kranji from the (Woodlands) Railway terminus, or to the Railway terminus from Kranji without trespassing".14


In 1909, the Johor State railway was opened. After the completion of the Causeway in 1923, the Johor State railway and the Singapore-Kranji railway were joined to become the Federated Malay States Railways (FMSR).15 The new FMSR did away with the numerous level crossings in Singapore, of which only two remained at Kranji Road and Choa Chu Kang Road.16 Both railway crossings survived until 2011, when the Singapore Land Authority commenced removal works of tracks and ancillary structures of the railway, which was operated by Keretapi Tanah Melayu Berhad (KTM).17

During the Japanese invasion of Singapore in 1942, many Allied soldiers and Singapore combatants of the volunteer army known as Dalforce fought against the Japanese at Woodlands, Kranji and Bukit Timah. Kranji marks the site of some of the most intense fighting during the Japanese attack on Singapore in 1942, where British and Australian troops fought to stop Japanese infiltration across the Kranji Reservoir.18

The site of the current Kranji War Cemetery was initially a temporary cemetery, but grew during the Occupation when a prisoner-of-war (POW) camp and hospital were established nearby at Woodlands. The site eventually became the final resting place of Allied soldiers who were killed.19

Developments
The Kranji Memorials
Situated south of Kranji Road and located off Woodlands Road is the Kranji War Memorials.20 The memorial was built in 1946 and designed by Colin St. Clair Oakes to commemorate the contributions of the 24,000 Allied soldiers who died during World War II.21 It is located within the Kranji War Cemetery along with several other memorials such as the Singapore (Unmaintainable Graves) Memorial, the Singapore Cremation Memorial, as well as the Singapore Civil Hospital Grave Memorial.22 In addition, adjacent to the Kranji War Cemetery is the Kranji Military Cemetery23 and the Singapore State Cemetery.24

Kranji MRT
Improvements were made to the accessibility of the area with the official opening of Kranji MRT Station in 1996.25 Kranji MRT Station was built on Woodlands Road following earlier plans to relocate the Singapore Turf Club from Bukit Timah, so as to free up prime land in Bukit Timah for residential development.26 In order to build the Kranji MRT Station as part of the Woodlands extension of the MRT system, the Land Office acquired 15 plots of land at Sungei Kadut Industrial Estate under the Land Acquisition Act.  Kranji MRT station lies along the Woodlands MRT line between Yew Tee and Marsiling MRT Stations.27

Singapore Turf Club
Another notable landmark in the vicinity is the Singapore Turf Club next to Kranji MRT station. The racecourse had been situated at Bukit Timah since 1933, before relocating to its current site in 1999.28 Costing $500 million, the Kranji racecourse was touted as a state-of-the-art racing facility.29



Author

Naidu Ratnala Thulaja



References
1. Savage, V. R., & Yeoh, B. S. (2013). Singapore street names: A study of toponymics. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 228. (Call no.: RSING 915.9570014 SAV-[TRA]); Urban Redevelopment Authority. (1997). Sungei Kadut planning area, planning report 1997. Singapore: Urban Redevelopment Authority, p. 8. (Call no.: RSING 711.4095957 SIN); Ramachandra, S. (1961). Singapore landmarks, past and present. Singapore: Eastern Universities Press, p. 34. (Call no.: RCLOS 959.57 RAM)
2. Urban Redevelopment Authority. (1997). Sungei Kadut planning area, planning report 1997. Singapore: Urban Redevelopment Authority, pp. 4, 8 (Call no.: RSING 711.4095957 SIN); Urban Redevelopment Authority. (2016, July 28). URA space. Retrieved 2016, July 21 from Urban Redevelopment Authority website: https://www.ura.gov.sg/maps/
3. Savage, V. R., & Yeoh, B. S. (2013). Singapore street names: A study of toponymics. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 228. (Call no.: RSING 915.9570014 SAV-[TRA]); Page 11 advertisements column 3. (1988, November 8). The Business Times, p. 11. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
4. Global Yellow Pages. (2016). Kranji Medical Clinic Pte Ltd. Retrieved 2016, July 20 from Global Yellow Pages website: http://www.yellowpages.com.sg/company/kranji-medical-clinic-pte-ltd; Cheong, J. (2006, October 22). Upstart mini-marts. The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Seow, J., & Aw, C. W. (2016, March 27). Not all dorms are spick and span. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/
5. Lin, M. (2016, March 8). Kranji Farms recognised as tourist spot. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva via NLB’s eResources website: http://eresources.nlb.gov.sg/

6. Singapore Mass Rapid Transit. (2016). SMRT Automotive Services: Location. Retrieved 2016, July 20 from Singapore Mass Rapid Transit website: https://www.smrt.com.sg/Doing-Business-with-Us/SMRT-Automotive-Services/Locations
7. Singapore Mass Rapid Transit. (2016). SMRT Automotive Services. Retrieved 2016, July 20 from Singapore Mass Rapid Transit website: https://www.smrt.com.sg/Doing-Business-with-Us/SMRT-Automotive-Services
8. Survey Department, Singapore. (1970). Singapore. Instrumental Plot – Kranji – Mandai [Topographic Map]. Retrieved from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline/
9. Singapore. (1905, December 23). Eastern Daily Mail and Straits Morning Advertiser, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Tang, K. F. (Ed.). (1993). Kampong days: Village life and times in Singapore revisited. Singapore: National Archives, p. 11. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 KAM-[HIS])
10. Survey Department, Singapore. (1970). Singapore. Instrumental Plot – Kranji – Mandai [Topographic Map]. Retrieved from National Archives of Singapore website: http://www.nas.gov.sg/archivesonline/; Schools where you can register your children. (1972, August 8). New Nation, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
11. Hwang, T. F. (1972, October 19). $4,200 refund for fraud principal. The Straits Times, p. 9. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
12. Where to cast your votes. (1963, September 21). The Straits Times, p. 5; Where to go to cast your vote. (1972, August 24). New Nation, p. 1; Where to cast your vote. (1972, September 1). The Straits Times, p. 12. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
13. Savage, V. R., & Yeoh, B. S. (2013). Singapore street names: A study of toponymics. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 228. (Call no.: RSING 915.9570014 SAV-[TRA]); Urban Redevelopment Authority. (1997). Woodlands planning area, planning report 1997. Singapore: Urban Redevelopment Authority, p. 8. (Call no.: RSING 711.4095957 SIN); Ramachandra, S. (1961). Singapore landmarks, past and present. Singapore: Eastern Universities Press, p. 34. (Call no.: RCLOS 959.57 RAM)
14. Singapore-Johore Railway. (1903, April 11). The Straits Times, p. 5; Untitled. (1903, November 21). The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
15. Savage, V. R., & Yeoh, B. S. (2013). Singapore street names: A study of toponymics. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 219. (Call no.: RSING 915.9570014 SAV-[TRA])
16. Opening of new F.M.S.R. terminal station. (1932, May 7). Malayan Saturday Post, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Urban Redevelopment Authority. (2015, June 26). Rail corridor: Removal works. Retrieved 2016, July 20 from Urban Redevelopment Authority website: https://www.ura.gov.sg/railcorridor/removal.html
17. Urban Redevelopment Authority. (2015, June 26). Rail corridor: Removal works. Retrieved 2016, July 20 from Urban Redevelopment Authority website: https://www.ura.gov.sg/railcorridor/removal.html
18. Corfield, J. J., & Corfield R. S. (2006). Encyclopedia of Singapore. Singapore: Talisman Pub, p. 37. (Call no.: RSING 959.57003 COR-[HIS])
19. Wan, M. H., & Lau, J. (2009). Heritage places of Singapore. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, pp. 212–214. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 WAN-[HIS])
20. Savage, V. R., & Yeoh, B. S. (2013). Singapore street names: A study of toponymics. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, p. 228. (Call no.: RSING 915.9570014 SAV-[TRA]); Ramachandra, S. (1961). Singapore landmarks, past and present. Singapore: Eastern Universities Press, p. 34. (Call no.: RCLOS 959.57 RAM)
21. Memorial to 24,000 who died for us. (1957, February 24). The Straits Times, p. 11. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
22. Commonwealth War Graves Commission. (2016). Kranji War Cemetery. Retrieved 2016, June 8 from Commonwealth War Graves Commission website: http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/2004200/KRANJI%20WAR%20CEMETERY
23. Commonwealth War Graves Commission. (2016). Kranji War Cemetery. Retrieved 2016, June 8 from Commonwealth War Graves Commission website: http://www.cwgc.org/find-a-cemetery/cemetery/2004200/KRANJI%20WAR%20CEMETERY
24. Dunlop, P. K. G. (2000). Street names of Singapore. Singapore: Who’s Who Pub., p. 178. (Call no.: RSING 959.57 DUN-[HIS]) 
25. Williams, A. (1993, March 18). Turf Club to move to Kranji close to proposed MRT station. The Straits Times, p. 40; Yeow, P. L. (1996, January 3). Factory land along Woodlands MRT line to be acquired. The Straits Times, p. 3; Tan, C. (1992, November 19). Another station added to Woodlands MRT line. The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
26. Williams, A. (1993, March 18). Turf Club to move to Kranji close to proposed MRT station. The Straits Times, p. 40. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
27. Yeow, P. L. (1996, January 3). Factory land along Woodlands MRT line to be acquired. The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
28. Williams, A. (1993, March 18). Turf Club to move to Kranji close to proposed MRT station. The Straits Times, p. 40. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Singapore Turf Club. (2016). Corporate profile. Retrieved 2016, July 20 from Singapore Turf Club website: http://www.turfclub.com.sg/Corporate/AboutUs/Pages/CorporateProfile.aspx
29. Lim, P. H. L. (Ed.). (2009). Chronicle of Singapore: Fifty years of headline news 1959–2009. Singapore: Didier Millet in association with National Library Board, p. 290. (Call no.: RSING 959.5705 CHR-[HIS])



The information in this article is valid as at 2004 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

Subject
Street names--Singapore
Law and government>>National development>>Urban development
Urbanization--Singapore
Streets and Places
War Memorials--Singapore
Architecture and Landscape>>Streets and Places
Arts>>Architecture>>Public and commercial buildings