Ang Mo Kio–Thye Hua Kwan Hospital



Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital is a community hospital established in June 1993 to serve the rehabilitative needs of the community, particularly the elderly.1 Providing mainly rehabilitation and geriatric care, the hospital is home to Singapore’s first acupuncture clinic situated within a hospital.2 It is also one of a few step-down care hospitals in Singapore.3 The hospital aims to nurture patients to become self-reliant and assists them in regaining as much of their independence as possible by developing a tailored rehabilitation plan for each patient.4

History
The government established the Ang Mo Kio Community Hospital (AMKCH) as part of its efforts to lower healthcare costs, especially for the elderly, by setting up community hospitals. The hospital, which began operations in June 1993, provided rehabilitation services, medical care, respite care and a day hospital for the elderly. It was situated in a residential housing estate surrounded by Housing and Development Board flats and condominiums so that medical facilities were within easy reach of the general population. Built at a cost of S$40 million, the hospital was home to 10 outpatient clinics, which were rented out to physicians and specialists.5

On 1 April 2002, the management of AMKCH was transferred from SingHealth to the Thye Hua Kwan Moral Society and the Chee Hoon Kog Moral Promotion Society. The move was in line with the government’s push for voluntary welfare organisations to run step-down care institutions in Singapore.6

In 2003, AMKCH became the first private hospital to put up isolation wards for patients recovering from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). This halfway house for post-SARS patients helped to ease the load on government hospitals.7

The hospital was renamed Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital (AMK-THKH) on 23 March 2006.8

Facilities and services
The hospital’s main services include inpatient rehabilitation for recuperating patients,9 a day rehabilitation centre to help patients with debilitating conditions caused by disease or injury regain independence in their daily activities,10 and home care (home medical, home nursing and home therapy) for patients who have difficulty travelling out of their homes.11


Beyond rehabilitative care, the AMK-THKH also helps patients re-integrate back into society as smoothly as possible after discharge. The hospital provides counselling and support services for the patients and their families, and assists the families in preparing a care plan after the patient is discharged.12 The hospital’s therapy services include physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech therapy for inpatients.13

The hospital also provides traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) treatment for inpatients and outpatients. It runs the TCM Medical Centre in partnership with the Thye Hua Kwan Moral Society. It is one of the few hospitals in Singapore to offer TCM in addition to rehabilitative care services.14

Located within AMK-THKH is the Healing Hub, which acts as a one-stop solution for customers needing pharmaceutical products and rehabilitation aids. It also offers product information and advice to patients and their caregivers on various medical conditions.15



Authors
Naidu Ratnala Thulaja & Leong Hui Chuan




References
1. Pereira, B. (1993, April 14). New hospital offers new class of wards. The Straits Times, p. 24. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
2. Hospital care for patients at home. (1997, March 27). The Straits Times, p. 35; Wee, L. (1999, August 16). They’re puncturing the myth. The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
3. VWOs to run Ang Mo Kio hospital. (2001, December 11). The Straits Times, p. 6; Further care for discharged patients. (2002, April 2). The Straits Times, p. 6. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
4. Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital. (2011). About us. Retrieved 2016, July 5 from Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital website: http://www.amkh.com.sg/about_overview.php
5. Pereira, B. (1993, April 14). New hospital offers new class of wards. The Straits Times, p. 24; Govt to operate new hospital at Ang Mo Kio. (1993, April 13). The Straits Times, p. 20. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
6. VWOs to run Ang Mo Kio hospital. (2001, December 11). The Straits Times, p. 6; Further care for discharged patients. (2002, April 2). The Straits Times, p. 6. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
7. ‘Halfway house’ care at Ang Mo Kio hospital. (2003, May 2). The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
8. Ang Mo Kio Hospital gets new name. (2006, March 24). Today, p. 14. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
9. Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital. (2011). Our services: In-patient care. Retrieved 2016, July 5 from Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital website: http://www.amkh.com.sg/our_services_ip_care.php
10. Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital. (2011). Our services: Day Rehabilitation Centre. Retrieved 2016, July 5 from Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital website: http://www.amkh.com.sg/our_services_dr_centre.php
11. Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital. (2011). Our services: Home care. Retrieved 2016, July 5 from Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital website: http://www.amkh.com.sg/our_services_t_services_homecare.php; Further care for discharged patients. (2002, April 2). The Straits Times, p. 6. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
12. Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital. (2011). Our services: In-patient care. Retrieved 2016, July 5 from Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital website: http://www.amkh.com.sg/our_services_ip_care.php
13. Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital. (2011). Our services: Therapy services. Retrieved 2016, July 5 from Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital website: http://www.amkh.com.sg/our_services_t_services.php
14. Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital. (2011). Our services: Traditional Chinese medicine. Retrieved 2016, July 5 from Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital website: http://www.amkh.com.sg/our_services_tc_medicine.php
15. Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital. (2011). Retail services. Retrieved 2016, July 5 from Ang Mo Kio-Thye Hua Kwan Hospital website: http://www.amkh.com.sg/retail_services.php



The information in this article is valid as at 25 August 2016 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

 

Subject
Public health
Health and medicine>>Health services
Streets and Places
Hospitals--Singapore
Organisations
Rehabilitation centers--Singapore
Community and Social Services
Arts>>Architecture>>Public and commercial buildings
Politics and Government>>Health