Yew Tee MRT station



Yew Tee MRT Station, located in northwestern Singapore, lies between the Choa Chu Kang and the Kranji MRT stations on the North-South Line.1 It was constructed in the 1990s to serve the northern part of the expanded Choa Chu Kang town as part of the Woodlands extension. It is named after the Yew Tee Village, which used to be located near the site of the train station.2

History
Yew Tee MRT Station was named after the Yew Tee Village, which used to be located near Stagmont Ring Road, off Woodlands Road. During the Japanese Occupation of Singapore (1942–45), the Japanese used this village to store oil, prompting the naming of the village “Yew Tee”, meaning “oil pond” in Teochew.3 A total of 18,685 sq m of land between Yew Tee and Kranji MRT stations was acquired during the construction of the Woodlands MRT line, which affected 16 factories operating along the stretch.4


Description
With a kampong-style roof and clad in colours chosen to blend in with the surroundings, the Yew Tee MRT Station was officially opened on 10 February 1996 together with the rest of the Woodlands extension route. The S$1.3-billion rail line measuring a total of 16 km was opened by then Prime Minister Goh Chok Tong.5 Facilities at the station include a station control room, extended call-zone areas, 42 bicycle stands, real-time electronic display boards, covered walkways to nearby buildings, four shopping units, conveniently located bus stops and a taxi stand.6

Soon after the opening of the MRT station, the Urban Redevelopment Authority released its development guide plan, with the vision to transform the Choa Chu Kang estate into a residential district. This included the construction of private and public housing developments, parks, recreational facilities, shopping amenities, schools and community facilities.7 A new sports complex was constructed in 2000 at a cost of S$58.5 million and this was followed by the opening of a five-storey community club that incorporates a day-care education centre and a neighbourhood police centre.8



Author

Naidu Ratnala Thulaja



References
1. Better layouts for six new MRT stations. (1992, November 19). The Straits Times, p. 22. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
2. Kwan, C. T. (1991, November 20). Station names for Woodlands line have ties to surroundings. The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
3. Kwan, C. T. (1991, November 20). Station names for Woodlands line have ties to surroundings. The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
4. Yeow, P. L. (1996, January 3). Factory land along Woodlands MRT line to be acquired. The Straits Times, p. 3. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
5. Leong, C. T. (1996, January 14). Woodlands MRT line to open next month. The Straits Times, p. 1; Nadarajah, I., & Kee, J. (1996, January 21). Residents prepare for easier life with Woodlands MRT line. The Straits Times, p. 24. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
6. Step off the bus and into the MRT station. (1996, January 31). The Straits Times, p. 19; Tan, C. (1992, December 10). More retail space for Woodlands MRT stops. The Straits Times, p. 26. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
7. Tan, C. (1996, May 17). URA to turn Choa Chu Kang into choice residential district. The Straits Times, p. 64. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
8. Yew Tee to get sports complex. (1999, September 17). The Straits Times, p. 45. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.


The information in this article is valid as at 2003 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

 

Subject
Local transit--Singapore
Architecture and Landscape>>Building Types>>Public Buildings
Business, finance and industry>>Industry>>Services>>Transportation and logistics
Local transit stations--Singapore
Transportation
Public buildings
Arts>>Architecture>>Public and commercial buildings
Commerce and Industry>>Transportation
Urban transportation--Singapore