Cat Welfare Society



Officially registered as a society in 1999, the Cat Welfare Society is a predominantly volunteer-run non-profit organisation that aims to protect the wellbeing and lives of cats in Singapore. The society achieves this through sterilisation programmes and education initiatives, as well as by working closely with various stakeholders such as caregivers, government bodies, residents and town councils.1

Background and establishment
Lynn Yeo, an eye surgeon in private practice, together with some friends, were motivated to form a society advocating cat welfare after reading about a case of animal abuse in a newspaper article – five newborn kittens died after they were set alight in a box on the night of 30 June 1999.2 The group of animal lovers were thus compelled to act, out of concern for the safety and wellbeing of street cats in Singapore as their population expands.3  


The collective had initially wanted to name the society “Cat Project”, but was advised by the Registry of Societies to take the name “Cat Welfare Society” (CWS) instead. The group acceded, and the CWS was officially established under the Societies Act on 23 October 1999. The society was subsequently recognised as a charity on 28 June 2004. On 8 May 2013, the CWS successfully registered as an institution of a public character for a two-year term, which enabled donors to make tax-deductible donations.4

The society is entirely funded by donations, membership subscriptions and proceeds from merchandise sales. Its minimal overheads and low administration costs ensure that the majority of the funds raised are channelled into its feline sterilisation programmes and efforts to improve the wellbeing of the cat community.5

Predominantly run by volunteers, the CWS does not have a physical office space.6

Since its inception in 1999, the society has been actively engaged in programmes and activities aligned with their mission to safeguard the wellbeing of community cats. These include facilitating rescue, adoption and sterilisation of cats, as well as public education initiatives and mediation.7


Sterilisation schemes and anti-culling stance
Since its founding, the CWS has been a strong campaigner for the use of sterilisation, instead of culling, to manage the stray cat population in Singapore. The society believes that the latter is a humane and effective means for achieving the same end; hence, sterilisation efforts have been a core part of its work.8


The islandwide culling of street cats carried out by the Agri-food and Veterinary Authority of Singapore (AVA) in May 2003 – as part of the “Singapore’s OK” hygiene and cleanliness campaign – drew ire from the CWS, other animal welfare groups and members of the public. The culling prompted the CWS to hold a joint press conference with the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Action for Singapore Dogs. The group appealed to the government to reinstate the Stray Cat Rehabilitation Scheme, a government-sponsored sterilisation programme, which had been suspended on the grounds that it did not work, while culling efforts were ramped up.9 As the government stood its ground, the CWS, in collaboration with volunteers and veterinary clinics, dug into its own funds for the continued sterilisation of cats.10

After the AVA discontinued its sterilisation scheme, the CWS expanded its own sterilisation programme. The society organised a series of “Spay Day Clinics” in 2006; since 2007, Spay Day has been an annual nationwide event, during which cats are sterilised for free.11

In 2011, the society partnered with the AVA to launch the Stray Cats Sterilisation Programme (SCSP). The SCSP covered four areas: Tampines North, Ang Mo Kio Central, Chong Pang and MacPherson. Under the SCSP, the AVA sponsors the full microchipping fee and half of the sterilisation cost, while the society funds the rest. The society stated that the SCSP was one of the reasons it achieved its highest sterilisation figure in 2013 – 4,479 cats were sterilised that year.12

In 2014, more than a decade after the previous islandwide sterilisation programme was axed, the SCSP was rolled out on a full scale. Community cats from Housing and Development Board (HDB) estates are now eligible for free sterilisation and microchipping at selected veterinary clinics, while subsidised sterilisation is available for felines in non-HDB residences. The programme also includes a reimbursement scheme whereby society members can receive up to S$30 in reimbursement for each sterilised cat.13

Complementing the SCSP is the society’s Trap-Neuter-Return-Manage programme. With the help of volunteers, community cats are trapped and then sent to a veterinary clinic for sterilisation. After recovering from the surgery, the cats are released in the locations they were picked up.14

Adoption
Besides sterilisation, the CWS views adoption as another key means to saving cats’ lives. The society’s website features an adoption board as a platform for rehoming cats. In addition, the CWS also organises adoption drives for stray, abused or abandoned cats.15 Since 2011, the society has partnered with Pet Lovers Foundation to hold monthly adoption drives at Pet Lovers Centre outlets. Between 2011 and 2013, 300 cats were successfully adopted through these adoption drives.16

Mediation
One of the society’s core activities is mediation, which is undertaken by part-time mediation officers and volunteers. They act as liaisons between residents, volunteers, cat owners, caregivers, residential and management committees, town councils and other government bodies, to resolve cat-related issues. These include cat hoarding and complaints about matters such as defecation, caterwauling and irresponsible feeding.17

Fighting animal abuse
The society takes an active stand against animal abuse. Besides investigating cases of animal abuse, volunteers and society members have also carried out night patrols in areas where abuse cases were reported and offered monetary rewards for information leading to the capture of the perpetrators.18

Education and raising public awareness
The society, in partnership with various organisations and institutions, regularly holds events that educate the public on matters such as responsible pet ownership, respect for animals and co-existence with stray cats. Such events include the AVA’s Responsible Pet Ownership roadshow, World Animal Day and school visits.19 The education outreach also extends to caregivers of community cats, broaching matters such as responsible feeding practices, so as to foster harmonious relations between caregivers, residents and town councils.20


The CWS has also produced a number of educational videos, pamphlets and other collaterals to spread awareness about its cause.21

Fundraising
As the CWS does not receive regular funding and is solely dependent on donations, membership subscriptions and merchandise sales to sustain its work and operations, it is actively involved in fundraising efforts. The society has also been the beneficiary of fundraising events held by organisations that support its cause. Over the years, various fundraising events such as “cat tea parties”, concerts and photo exhibitions have been held.22


In 2010, the CWS started the Special Appeals section on its website so as to help caregivers alleviate the cost of medical treatment for sick, injured or abused community cats. With this platform, caregivers can appeal to the public for donations to provide medical help for these cats.23

Stand against no-cats policy in public housing
The CWS has played a key role in advocating for a review of the HDB’s long-held ruling forbidding public-housing dwellers from keeping cats as pets – a regulation that the society believes is based on “flawed reasoning and [a] fear of change”.24 The society believes that relaxing the ban on the HDB ruling against keeping cats will allow many street cats to be adopted into homes and thus manage the stray cat population in Singapore and reduce complaints about them.25


In October 2001, the society presented its first proposal regarding the no-cats policy to the HDB and Ministry of National Development (MND); however, it was rejected. The second proposal, endorsed by about 30 veterinarians and 3,000 members of the public endorsing a review of the ruling, was submitted in July 2002. One of the recommendations included in the proposal was a feline registration scheme for cat owners, similar to that for pet dogs. The second appeal was also rejected.26

“Love Cats” project
A decade later, a pilot two-year HDB cat-ownership programme known as “Love Cats” was launched on 20 October 2012 by the MND, with the aim of testing a “community management framework on responsible pet ownership”. Initiated and led by the CWS, the “Love Cats” project allows one pet cat per flat of the 123 HDB blocks in Chong Pang estate. The government provided S$70,000 to the CWS to implement the programme over two years.27

Under the programme, Chong Pang residents who wish to own cats are required to register with the CWS. Cat owners are then obliged to abide by the code of responsible behaviour, which includes microchipping and sterilising their cats, as well as ensuring that the cats are kept indoors.28 Besides educating the residents on responsible pet ownership, the CWS also handles cat-related complaints by residents in the Chong Pang district and carries out mediation for the cases.29

In January 2015, the government announced that the “Love Cats” project in Chong Pang would be extended for another two years to allow more time to “monitor and assess the impact of this initiative”, which may be rolled out to Marine Parade and other constituencies. As at 11 January 2015, 126 households in the Chong Pang estate are registered as cat owners and participate in the “Love Cats” project.30

Other activities
In July 2001, the CWS introduced a pet-assisted therapy programme called “Dr Meow”. Working together with the North East Community Development Council, the society aimed to use the programme to provide feline companionship for senior citizens in eldercare homes and children in daycare centres through close contact with cats. The programme also sought to cultivate greater understanding and empathy for animals, as well as to offer opportunities for adoption. However, the pilot project was halted after six months, as the cats exhibited signs of stress due to frequent changes in their surroundings and exposure to strangers.31

The society partnered with cat lover and former radio deejay Jessica Seet to establish Singapore’s first cat museum, Lion City Kitty. Officially opened on 9 January 2015, the museum occupies three storeys of a shophouse at 8 Purvis Street. In addition to the museum aspect – consisting of a presentation of how cats supposedly first came to settle in Singapore as well as an exhibition of cat-related paraphernalia and famous felines – Lion City Kitty also has an area where visitors can interact with cats. It is hoped that, through the latter, those with an aversion to cats would be encouraged to think differently. With the help of CWS volunteers, Lion City Kitty provides feline-related informative sessions and fields adoption-related inquiries. The social enterprise also facilitates cat adoptions.32

The society has also worked with many organisations in various capacities as part of its community and corporate outreach initiatives. In 2013, the society spearheaded a cattery clean-up project for Deutsche Bank and Credit Suisse employees as part of the companies’ corporate social responsibility programme. In the same year, the CWS provided cat therapy sessions for the patients at Thye Hua Kuan Hospital.33



Authors
Sharon Teng and Fiona Lim




References
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11. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). CWS annual report year ending 2006, p. 4. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_05-06.pdf; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report for the year ended 31 Dec 2007, p. 4. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_06-07.pdf; Cat Welfare Society. (2011, October 14). Celebrity Karen Mok and Minister of State BG(NS) Tan Chuan-Jin appeal to Singaporeans to support Spay Day [Press release]. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/spayday2011
12. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report: For the year ending 31 Dec 2013, pp. 5, 11. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/sites/default/files/cws-annual-reports/CWS%20Annual%20Report%20Year%20Ending%202013.pdf
13. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Sterilisation support programme. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/catsnip; Ee, D. (2014, July 7). Islandwide plan to sterilise stray cats. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva.
14. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Frequently asked questions – Trap-Neuter-Return-Manage (TNRM). Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/faq/6
15. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Public adoption bulletin board. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/adoptions; An alternative to culling stray cats. (2003, July 28). Today, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Chong, M. (2003, October 21). Cat ‘adoptathon’ on Sunday. Today, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
16. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report: For the year ending 31 Dec 2013, p. 17. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/sites/default/files/cws-annual-reports/CWS%20Annual%20Report%20Year%20Ending%202013.pdf
17. Community help for cat hoarders. (2012, May 21). The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report: For the year ending 31 Dec 2013, pp. 10, 15–16. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/sites/default/files/cws-annual-reports/CWS%20Annual%20Report%20Year%20Ending%202013.pdf
18. Nur Amira Abdul Karim. (2006, August 20). Animal abusers beware, hunt is on. The Straits Times, p. 11. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Aw, C. W. (2008, May 20). 7 abused cats dead: $10k reward for info.The Straits Times, p. 31. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Report for the year ended 31 December 2001, p. 7. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_2000-01.pdf; Fong, T. (2006, August 14). Suspected cat killer caught on camera by kitty detectives. The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Leong, W. K. (2013, January 3). Animal welfare groups step up hunt for kitten killers. Today. Retrieved from Factiva; Other cat abusers. (2006, September 24). The New Paper, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
19. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report: For the year ending 31 Dec 2013, p. 17. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/sites/default/files/cws-annual-reports/CWS%20Annual%20Report%20Year%20Ending%202013.pdf; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Report for the year ended 31 December 2001, pp. 8–10. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_2000-01.pdf; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Our outreach programmes. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/education; Plenty of fun for you and your pet. (2002, October 5). The Straits Times, p. 14. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
20. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Posters, brochures & links: Responsible feeding. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/educationmaterials#feeding; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Caregivers in the heartlands: A kind, gracious, harmonious neighbourhood for all. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/Handbook/HandbookCaregivers.pdf
21. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Posters, brochures & links. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/educationmaterials
22. Cheah, U.-H. (2009, October 16). Where and when to give. The Business Times, p. 25. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report for the year ending 31 Dec 2013, pp. 3, 18. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/sites/default/files/cws-annual-reports/CWS%20Annual%20Report%20Year%20Ending%202013.pdf; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Report for the year ended 31 December 2001, pp. 9–10. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_2000-01.pdf ; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report for the year ended 31 Dec 2009, pp. 5, 15–16. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_08-09.pdf; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report for the year ended 31 Dec 2010, p. 21. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_09-10.pdf; Narayanan, S. (2002, September 25). Paws a while… and support them. The New Paper, p. 36. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
23. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Open appeals. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/specialappeals; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report for the year ended 31 Dec 2010, p. 12. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_09-10.pdf
24. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). CWS annual report year ending 2004, p. 4. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_03-04.pdf
25. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). CWS annual report year ending 2004, p. 13. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_03-04.pdf; Leong, P. (2002, July 7). Another appeal to let cats into HDB flats. The Straits Times, p. 32. Retrieved from NewspaperSG;
26. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Report for the year ended 31 December 2001, pp. 3, 6, 11–12. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_2000-01.pdf; Leong, P. (2002, July 7). Another appeal to let cats into HDB flats. The Straits Times, p. 32. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Frances, J. (2002, September 3). Cat-in-flat proposal rejected. Today, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
27. Ministry of National Development. (2012, October 20). ‘Love Cats’ cat ownership pilot project in Chong Pang [Press release]. Retrieved from Ministry of National Development website: http://app.mnd.gov.sg/Newsroom/NewsPage.aspx?ID=3866&category=Press%20Release&year=2012&RA1=&RA2=&RA3=; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report for the year ending 31 Dec 2012, p. 14. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_11-12.pdf
28. Veron. (2012, October 21). No reason why cat ownership programme can’t expand: K Shanmugam. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/lovecatspilot; Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report for the year ending 31 Dec, p. 14. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_11-12.pdf
29. Vasko, L. (2013, November 16). HDB life for cats. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva.
30. Khew, C. (2015, January 11). Hello, kitty may get to Marine Parade yet. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva; Tan, A. (2015, January 10). Kitty could get a home in more HDB flats. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva.
31. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Report for the year ended 31 December 2001, p. 14. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/drupal/userfiles/docs/CWS-Annual-Reports/cws_agm_report_2000-01.pdf; Paul, P. (2005, July 7). Pooch power. The Straits Times, p. 19. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
32. Kaur, G. (2014, December 19). Frolick with felines at this museum. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva;Tan, A. (2015, January 10). Kitty could get a home in more HDB flats. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva; Tan, E. (2015, January 10). S’pore’s first cat museum opens on Purvis Street. Today. Retrieved from Factiva.
33. Cat Welfare Society. (n.d.). Annual report for the year ending 31 Dec 2013, p. 17. Retrieved from Cat Welfare Society website: http://www.catwelfare.org/sites/default/files/cws-annual-reports/CWS%20Annual%20Report%20Year%20Ending%202013.pdf




Further resources
Cat Welfare Society. (2005). The real Singapore cat. Singapore: Cat Welfare Society.
Call no.: RSING 636.80095957 REA


Chong, C. K. (2000, March 6). More people ready to report animal abuse. The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Kua, D. (2002, July 10). Cats make great pets in HDB flat. The Straits Times, p. 23. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Kua, D. (2006, May 18). Shelters not the answer. Today, p. 28. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Kua, D. (2007, January 31). Time to cull those cat myths. Today, p. 28. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Lim, J., & Yeo, K. T. (2014, July 30). Executives by day, cat-women by night. Today. Retrieved from Factiva.

Sterilising cats has not solved problem. (2003, May 3). The Straits Times, p. 31. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Tan, D. W. (2009, June 21). Suffer the little critters. The Straits Times, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Tan, S., & Lee, D. (2013, April 17). Dogs killed, cats slashed… Animal cruelty cases on the rise. The Straits Times. Retrieved from Factiva.

Tee, N. (2000, January 30). Cat about town.The Straits Times, p. 10. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.

Teo, P. L. (2000, August 15). Saving cats and humanity. The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.



The information in this article is valid as at 3 June 2015 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

Subject
Nature
Community and Social Services
Nature and Environment
Organisations

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