Nasir Jalil



Nasir Jalil (b. 1955–d. 8 June 2011, Terengganu, Malaysia)1 was a footballer who played for Singapore and Terengganu in the Malaysia Cup. Nicknamed “Crazy Horse” for his tireless style of play,2 Nasir won the Malaysia Cup for Singapore and later reached the final for Terengganu. After moving to Terengganu in 1982, Nasir settled there and eventually became a Malaysian citizen.

Football career in Singapore
Nasir was a player with Farrer Park United and by 1975, was known as the top goal scorer in his team.3 He made his Malaysia Cup debut in March 1976 when he was brought in as a substitute for Dollah Kassim in the match against Penang. Nasir’s equalising goal salvaged a 2–2 draw for Singapore.4 He also earned the nickname “Supersub” as a result of this match.5


Nasir’s scoring skill was further proven in 1977, when he played a pivotal role in Singapore’s victory in the Malaysia Cup final; it was Singapore’s first win in 12 years. On 28 May, at the Merdeka Stadium in Kuala Lumpur, Nasir scored the equaliser after entering as a substitute for S. Rajagopal, helping his side to defeat Penang 3-2 after extra-time.6 Unfortunately, he was one of four Singapore players who had their medals snatched from them when the team was mobbed by fans after the game.7 Nasir did not participate in the 1977 Southeast Asian (SEA) Games as he had gone on a pilgrimage to Mecca.8

Nasir kept up his winning streak in 1978 when he scored two goals in the Merdeka soccer tournament in July, thereby enabling Singapore to defeat Japan 2-1 in the match.9 In late 1978, he left for Riyadh for what was to have been a five-year religious studies course at a Saudi university, but decided to switch to a social sciences course at a different university a year later.10

Nasir returned to Singapore in December 1979 and was back in the Singapore squad the following month.11 He remained in the squad until April 1981, when he withdrew after citing a wish to make way for younger players.12

Move to Terengganu
In March 1982, Nasir left Singapore to play for Terengganu, together with fellow Singaporeans Syed Mutalib and Zainal Abidin. Apart from salaries and free housing, they were given other fringe benefits. Nasir also worked concurrently as a religious teacher during his time in Terengganu.13


In May 1982, Nasir scored the winning goal for Terengganu in the Malaysia Cup semi-final against Penang. However, the team was eventually defeated 1-0 by Selangor in the final.14 In 1985, Nasir scored two goals to help Terengganu achieve a 2–0 win over Singapore, in a memorable Malaysia Cup quarter-final.15 He became one of Terengganu’s most popular players, and was reported to have been “treated like royalty” and showered with gifts, houses and cars.16 His success inspired and paved the way for other Singaporean players to play for Malaysian states.17

End of football career
In March 1988, Nasir joined Premier League club Balestier United. It was reported that he had hoped the move would give him the opportunity to impress Singapore’s national team selectors, and allow him a swansong on the international scene.18 However, he did not make it to the national team.19


Nasir retired from competitive football in 1988 and embarked on a four-month trip to India, Pakistan and Bangladesh to train as a preacher. He worked as a religious teacher in Terengganu after his return and eventually became a Malaysian citizen.20

Illness and death
In 2003, Nasir was diagnosed with a brain tumour. Terengganu pledged a portion of its ticket collection from a Malaysian FA Cup match in 2004 for his medical treatment.21


Nasir suffered a relapse in late 2010 and underwent surgery in Kelantan in April 2011. In June 2011, he fell into a coma before passing away about a week later, on 8 June. He left behind a wife and six children.22



Author

Alvin Chua




References
1. Shamir Osman. (2011, June 9). Lions hero Nasir Jalil dies. Today, p. 60. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
2. Chen, F. (2011, June 9). ‘Crazy horse’ inspired many. The Straits Times, p. 16. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
3. Dorai, J. (1975, November 6). Opportunist Nasir a certainty? The Straits Times, p. 28. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
4. Rajendran, J. (1984, March 18). Home on the range. The Straits Times, p. 32; Dorai, J. (1976, March 27). Nasir Jalil is now a serious rival to Arshad and Co. The Straits Times, p. 39. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
5. Dorai, J. (1978, July 24). Nasir strikes. The Straits Times, p. 27. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
6. Seneviratne, P. (1977, May 29). The Malaysia Cup is ours after 12 long years. The Straits Times, p. 22. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
7. Dorai, J. (1977, May 30). Choo seeks new talent. The Straits Times, p. 29. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
8. Nasir Jalil hits three in. (1977, October 20). The Straits Times, p. 28. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
9. Dorai, J. (1978, July 24). Nasir strikes. The Straits Times, p. 27. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
10. Dorai, J. (1979, December 18). ‘Super-sub’ Nasir eyes national team berth [Microfilm no.: NL 10421]. The Straits Times, p. 37.
11. Dorai, J. (1980, January 1). ‘Crazy Horse’ Nasir in national squad. The Straits Times, p. 22. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
12. Dorai, J. (1981, April 10). ‘Crazy Horse’ Nasir quits national squad. The Straits Times, p. 39. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
13. Two join foreign clubs. (1982, March 5). The Straits Times, p. 2. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
14. Nasir’s night of glory. (1982, May 20). The Straits Times, p. 37; Selangor triumph in pulsating final. (1982, May 24). The Straits Times, p. 35. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
15. Dorai, J. (1985, May 3). Crazy Horse on the warpath. The Straits Times, p. 43. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
16. Dorai, J. (1986, January 1). Trengganu’s prized Lions. The Straits Times, p. 26. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
17. Rajendran, J. (1984, March 18). Home on the range. The Straits Times, p. 32; Dorai, J. (1984, January 5). Exodus III. The Straits Times, p. 39. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
18. Dorai, J. (1988, March 15). ‘Crazy Horse’ Nasir is set to bow out in style. The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
19. Principles count in matters of principal importance. (1988, June 19). The Straits Times, p. 30. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
20. Chew, J. (2004, May 23). Once a ‘crazy horse’, now he can’t even run. The New Paper, p. 16. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
21. Nasir has brain tumour. (2004, May 3). The Straits Times, p. 9. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
22. Chen, F. (2011, June 9). ‘Crazy horse’ inspired many. The Straits Times, p. 16; Shamir Osman. (2011, June 9). Lions hero Nasir Jalil dies. Today, p. 60. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.



The information in this article is valid as at 2011 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic.

 

Subject
Sports, recreation and travel>>Ball games>>Football
Football players--Singapore--Biography
Football players--Malaysia--Terengganu--Biography
Personalities
Nasir Jalil, 1955-2011
Personalities>>Biographies