Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura



The Majlis Ugama Islam Singapore (MUIS), or Islamic Religious Council of Singapore, was established as a statutory board in 1968 to advise the president of Singapore on all matters relating to Islam in Singapore. Its principal functions include the administration of zakat (tithe), wakaf (endowment), pilgrimage affairs, halal certification, as well as madrasah and Islamic education.1 Through its activities, MUIS also aims to facilitate a broader and deeper understanding of Islam.2

Origins
During the colonial period, the British administration formed advisory boards to represent the Muslim community on matters related to Islam.3 These were the Mohammedan and Hindu Endowment Board in 1905, the Mohammedan Advisory Board in 1915, and the Muslim Advisory Board in 1947.4 The idea to have a central body representing Muslims in Singapore was raised in 1948. A committee comprising representatives from various Singapore Muslim organisations was formed to consider “either the formation of a central Muslim body or the strengthening of any existing organisation to become the mouthpiece of Singapore Muslims”.5


In 1951, State Advocate General Ahmad Ibrahim, a Queen’s scholar with a law degree from Cambridge University, proposed setting up a Syariah court.6 The Muslims Bill was introduced in 1955 with the provision for the establishment of a religious court.7 The Syariah Court was set up eventually in 1958 with Taha Suhaimi as its president and judge.8 However, the Syariah Court did not have the powers to carry out its functions.9 The Administration of Muslim Law Bill was therefore introduced in 1960 to provide for the establishment of a council with statutory powers to serve as the authority on Muslim affairs.10 The bill was passed in parliament on 17 August 1966.11

Developments 
MUIS was only established on 1 July 1968, when the Administration of Muslim Law Act (AMLA) came into effect. According to then Minister for Culture and Social Affairs Othman Wok, the delay in setting up MUIS was due to the difficulty in finding suitable candidates to fill its top positions.12 Eventually in 1968, Ismail bin Abdul Aziz was appointed the first president of MUIS, Jamil bin Dzafir the first secretary, and Sanusi Mahmud, who was the president of the Syariah Court, became the first mufti (Islamic judge).13


MUIS initially operated out of office premises at Empress Place.14 It then moved to an office building known as the Islamic Centre of Singapore, which was built next to the Muhajirin Mosque along Braddell Road.15 This was one of the first mosques to be funded by Muslim donations to the Mosque Building Fund.16 The mosque and Islamic Centre were rebuilt to form the Singapore Islamic Hub, and officially opened in July 2009.17

The longest-serving mufti was Syed Isa Semait, who headed the organisation from 1972 to 2010.18 He was instrumental in making several crucial changes to local interpretations of Islamic laws, some of which were controversial. For example, his office issued a fatwa (religious ruling) to give Muslims the option of donating their organs without the consent of their family members.19

In the early decades, MUIS faced the problem of gaining the trust of the Muslim community, particularly when the government re-acquired some mosques that had stood on state land.20 MUIS officers also had to manage the expectations and needs of the Muslim community, which could generate unhappiness if unmet. In 1987, for instance, a man became violent and assaulted Syed Isa when a MUIS officer whom he wished to talk to about burial arrangements was not available.21 In 2005, there was public unhappiness when MUIS and its mosque affiliates failed to get sheep for slaughter in time for the yearly ritual sacrifice during Hari Raya Haji. This prompted a review of the process of obtaining the animals for the annual Feast of Sacrifice.22

In 2013, MUIS underwent a leadership restructuring. The post of chief executive was created, and Haji Abdul Razak Hassan Maricar was appointed as the first chief executive to lead the management team, while the president chairs the MUIS council in a non-executive capacity.23 The council is the decision-making body responsible for the formulation of policies and operational plans. It comprises the president of MUIS, the mufti of Singapore and other council members. All members are appointed by the president of the Republic of Singapore.24

Activities 
MUIS is structured into six areas of responsibility, namely:

(i) Administration of zakat, wakaf, pilgrimage affairs, halal certification and da’wah (missionary) activities.
(ii) Construction and administration of mosques, and their development and management.
(iii) Administration of Madrasah and Islamic education.
(iv) Issuance of fatwas.
(v) Provision of financial relief to poor and needy Muslims.
(vi) Provision of developmental grants to organisations.25

MUIS administers the Mosque Building and Mendaki Fund (MBMF). When it was established in 1975 as the Mosque Building Fund (MBF), its key purpose was to build a mosque in every new public housing estate in Singapore. With the establishment of the MENDAKI Foundation in 1984, the MBF was expanded to support educational and social programmes for the Malay/Muslim community, and was renamed the MBMF. In 2009 its role was further expanded to support religious education initiatives as well as to upgrade and revitalise older mosques.26

Since 1978, MUIS has been the sole body providing halal certification for eating establishments in Singapore.27 For the yearly haj or pilgrimage to Mecca, MUIS coordinates with travel agencies and the Saudi Arabian government so that Singapore pilgrims can have a safer and smoother journey.28 In the management of zakat and wakaf, MUIS acts as manager and disburser of these funds in accordance with Islamic principles.29

The Office of the Mufti provides religious direction to the Muslim community through its fatwas.30 It also sets the standards for the more ritualistic aspects of the religion. For example, the mufti announces the start and end of Ramadan, the fasting month.31

MUIS is also involved in Muslim religious education. Although madrasahs (religious schools) in Singapore had been established in Singapore long before MUIS came into being, the latter has become increasingly involved in the development of madrasah curriculum over the years. MUIS’s achievements in recent years include integrating three madrasahs into a streamlined joint madrasah system and the institution of a new part-time religious curriculum for youths known as A.L.I.V.E. (Learning Islamic Values Everyday).32 

MUIS also manages two sub-organisations: Harmony Centre and MUIS Academy. The Harmony Centre, located at An-Nadhah Mosque in Bishan, was formed in 2005 in response to calls for greater inter-faith understanding after the 11 September 2001 World Trade Centre tragedy in the United States.33 Through these organisations, MUIS encourages inter-faith dialogue and regularly participates in inter-religious activities to build relationships between people across the divide.34

Since 2006, the MUIS Academy has invited world-renowned speakers, such as Professor Tariq Ramadhan of Oxford University, Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf from the United States and writer Karen Armstrong, to give lectures in Singapore.35 It has also engaged in dialogue with various overseas institutes, such as the Hartford Seminary in the United States, to raise the level of inter-faith understanding.36

Timeline
1966:
Administration of Muslim Law Bill is passed in parliament.37

1968: Ismail Abdul Aziz, Sanusi Mahmood and Jamil Dzafir are appointed the first president, Mufti and secretary of MUIS respectively.38
1972: Mahmoud Hj Yusof is appointed the second president of MUIS; Syed Isa Semait is appointed Mufti.39
1974: Buang Siraj is appointed the third president of MUIS.
1975: The Mosque Building Fund is set up.
1977: Opening of Masjid Muhajirin, the first mosque built with the help of the Mosque Building Fund.
1978: First MUIS halal certificate is issued.
1980: Ismail Mohd Said is appointed the fourth president of MUIS.
1986: Ridzwan Dzafir is appointed the fifth president of MUIS.
1987: MUIS moves from Empress Place to Islamic Centre of Singapore at Braddell Road.
1988: Launch of MUIS logo.
1991: Zainul Abidin Rasheed is appointed the sixth president of MUIS.
1994: Launch of Madrasah Fund.
1996: Maarof Salleh is appointed the seventh president of MUIS.
1998: The first MUIS scholarships are awarded.
1999: The Office of the Mufti is set up.40
2002: MUIS is awarded People Developer Standard, a local system of ranking excellent organisational practices.41
2003: Alami Musa is appointed eighth president of MUIS.
2004: Launch of A.L.I.V.E, a revised part-time madrasah curriculum.42
2005: Launch of the Asatizah Recognition Scheme (allows registered religious teachers to be called ustaz, for men, and ustazah, for women)43
2006: Opening of Harmony Centre at An-Nadhah Mosque and launch of Distinguished Visitor Programme.44
2007: Launch of Singapore’s first halal directory.45
2008: MUIS is conferred the Public Service Award for Organisational Excellence.46
2009: Implementation of “Whole Plant” Halal Certification scheme.47
2010: MUIS is awarded the Public Service Milestone Award 2010.48
2011: Mohamed Fatris Bakaram is appointed Mufti of Singapore.49
2012: Launch of Wakaf Ilmu to enhance the quality of madrasah education.50
2013: Haji Abdul Razak Hassan Maricar is appointed the first chief executive of MUIS; MUIS is awarded the Singapore Quality Class (Star) award for Organisational Excellence.51



Author

Faizah bte Zakaria




References
1.Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2015, March 12). About Muis. Retrieved 2016, August 3 from MUIS website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/About; Singapore. The Statutes of the Republic of Singapore. (2009, Rev. ed.). Administration of Muslim Law Act (Cap 3, Section 3). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Singapore Statutes Online: http://statutes.agc.gov.sg/aol/search/display/view.w3p;page=0;query=DocId%3A3e90fc65-b364-434b-b2dc-ced1d9608640%20%20Status%3Ainforce%20Depth%3A0;rec=0; Tan, K., & Thio, L. (2015). Singapore: 50 constitutional moments that define a nation. Singapore: Marshall Cavendish Editions, pp. 69–70. (Call no.: RSING 342.5957029 TAN)
2. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapore. (2005). MUIS annual report 2005 [CD-ROM]. Singapore: MUIS, p. 11. (Call no.: RCLOS 297.65095957 SMRADA-[AR])
3. New advisory board. (1915, June 19). The Straits Times, p. 9. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
4. Yeoh, S. G. (2016). Religious praxis, modernity and non-modernity in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. In Religion, place, and modernity: Spatial articulations in Southeast Asia and East Asia. Leiden; Boston: Brill, p. 194. (Call no.: RSING 203.5095 REL); New advisory board. (1915, June 19). The Straits Times, p. 9; Named govt advisers. (1947, October 6). The Singapore Free Press, p. 5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
5. Muslims form committee. (1948, January 26). The Singapore Free Press, p. 5; Central body for Muslims. (1948, February 24). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
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7. New bill makes Muslim happy. (1956, October 8). The Straits Times, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Singapore. Parliament. Parliamentary debates: Official reports. (1955, November 21). Muslims Bill (Vol. 1, col. 968). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Parliament of Singapore website: https://sprs.parl.gov.sg/search/topic.jsp?currentTopicID=00047357-ZZ&currentPubID=00068870-ZZ&topicKey=00068870-ZZ.00047357-ZZ_1%2Bid004_19551121_S0003_T00041-bill%2B
8. Govt picks Islam court president. (1958, October 22). The Straits Times, p. 4; Rate of Muslim divorces falls in Singapore. (1958, December 30). The Straits Times, p. 9. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
9. Singapore. Parliament. Parliamentary debates: Official reports. (1958, January 13). Muslims (Amendment) Bill (Vol. 12, col. 29). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Parliament of Singapore website:  https://sprs.parl.gov.sg/search/topic.jsp?currentTopicID=00049744-ZZ&currentPubID=00068976-ZZ&topicKey=00068976-ZZ.00049744-ZZ_1%2Bid029_19600113_S0003_T00131-bill%2B; Muslim marriage law will go to select committee. (1960, January 14). The Straits Times, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
10. Singapore. Parliament. Parliamentary debates: Official reports. (1960, November 29). Administration of Muslim Law Bill (Vol. 14, col. 5). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Parliament of Singapore website:  https://sprs.parl.gov.sg/search/topic.jsp?currentTopicID=00050142-ZZ&currentPubID=00069000-ZZ&topicKey=00069000-ZZ.00050142-ZZ_1%2Bid008_19601129_S0003_T00031-bill%2B; Muslim law. (1960, December 8). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
11. Singapore. Parliament. Parliamentary debates: Official reports. (1966, August 17). Administration of Muslim Law Bill (Vol. 25, col. 237). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Parliament of Singapore website:  https://sprs.parl.gov.sg/search/topic.jsp?currentTopicID=00052492-ZZ&currentPubID=00069147-ZZ&topicKey=00069147-ZZ.00052492-ZZ_1%2Bid031_19660817_S0003_T00031-bill%2B; Muslim Law Bill is passed in parliament. (1966, August 18). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
12. Singapore. Parliament. Parliamentary debates: Official reports. (1967, December 19). Budget, Ministry of Culture and Social Affairs (Vol. 26, col. 838). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Parliament of Singapore website: https://sprs.parl.gov.sg/search/topic.jsp?currentTopicID=00053238-ZZ&currentPubID=00069177-ZZ&topicKey=00069177-ZZ.00053238-ZZ_1%2Bid007_19671219_S0002_T00071-budget%2B; No suitable men for 3 top posts. (1967, December 23). The Straits Times, p. 4. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 29–31. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957 GRE)
13. Singapore. The Statutes of the Republic of Singapore. (2009, Rev. ed.). Administration of Muslim Law Act (Cap 3, Legislative History). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Singapore Statutes Online: http://statutes.agc.gov.sg/aol/search/display/view.w3p;ident=61053d11-8a61-45c7-9c3b-75bf4650fa2b;page=0;query=DocId%3A3e90fc65-b364-434b-b2dc-ced1d9608640%20%20Status%3Ainforce%20Depth%3A0;rec=0#xv-; Inche Ismail heads top Muslim council. (1968, July 3). The Straits Times, p. 8; ‘Majlis Ugama dapat bantu umat Islam S’pura’. (1968, July 2). Berita Harian, p. 1; Haji Sanusi jadi Mufti S’pura. (1968, October 27). Berita Harian, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
14. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 5, 30. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
15. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapore. (2005). MUIS annual report 2005 [CD-ROM]. Singapore: MUIS, p. 51. (Call no.: RCLOS 297.65095957 SMRADA-[AR]); Islamic centre will be source of pride. (1985, March 14). The Straits Times, p. 12; Pejabat baru: Muis mulakan dengan doa. (1987, November 17). Berita Harian, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
16. Mosque in Toa Payoh ready soon. (1976, September 20). The Straits Times, p. 26. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 44, 122. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
17. Islamic Hub planned. (2005, May 29). The New Paper, p. 15; Three-in-one Islamic complex by 2009. (2005, May 29). The Straits Times, p. 13; Low, A. (2009, July 10). Muis at 40: Festivities kick off at Islamic Hub. The Straits Times, p. 43. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
18. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2011). MUIS annual report 2011 (p. 42). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/documents/Annual_Reports/v16_MUIS_AR_Ed_14_JUN_2011.pdf
19. Allowing a new lease of life. (2004, August 28). The Straits Times, p. 7. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (n.d.). Organ transplant in Islam: The fiqh of organ transplant and its applications in Singapore (pp. 42–43). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.officeofthemufti.sg/documents/Muis%20kidney%20book%20ENG.pdf
20. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 32–34. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957); The false claims made in the pamphlet. (1982, January 22). The Straits Times, p. 8; Let the facts speak. (1987, October 6). The Straits Times, p. 16. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
21. Assault reported in Empress Place office. (1987, June 26). The Straits Times, p. 13. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
22. Arlina Arshad. (2005, June 4). Moves to get Korban sheep here on time. The Straits Times, p. 12; Arlina Arshad. (2005, November 5). Earlier shipping of Korban sheep. The Straits Times, p. 12; Late arrival of 4,600 sheep from Australia. (2005, January 24). Today, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
23. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2013). MUIS annual report 2013 (pp. 4–6). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/documents/Annual_Reports/Annual%20Report_Full_2013.pdf
24. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2016, August 7). Council of Muis. Retrieved 2016, November 5 from MUIS Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/About/council-of-muis.html; Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2015, March 12). About Muis. Retrieved 2016, Novermber 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/About/
25. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2015, March 12). Overview of Muis. Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/About/overview-of-muis.html
26. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2016). History of the Mosque Building and Mendaki Fund. Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/mbmf/About/Background.html; Suzaina Kadir. (2007) Muslim politics, the state and society. In K. P. Tan (Ed.), Renaissance Singapore?: Economy, culture and politics. Singapore: NUS Press, pp. 143–44. (Call no.: RSING 959.5705 REN-[HIS])
27. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, p. 74. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
28. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, p. 76. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957); Green, A. (2006). Our journey: 30 years of haj services in Singapore. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 75, 91–92. (Call no.: RSING 297.352 GRE)
29. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 102–108. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957); Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2016). Singapore Zakat Authority. Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website:  http://www.zakat.sg/About-Us/singapore-zakat-authority.html; Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2015). Admin & management of Wakaf by Muis. Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/wakaf/About/Admin-Management-of-Wakaf-by-Muis.html#abt
30. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2014). Overview of Muis. Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/About/overview-of-muis.html
31. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 34–35. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957); Fasting: Muslims urged to follow mufti’s decision. (1980, March 22). The Straits Times, p. 6. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
32. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 78-79, 100. (Call no.: SING English 297.65095957)
33. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, p. 94. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957); Green, A. (2007). Continuing the legacy: 30 years of the Mosque Building Fund in Singapore. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, p. 86. (Call no.: RSING 297.355957 GRE)
34. Feisal Abdul Rauf. (2010). Forging a common humanity. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, p. 35. (Call no.: RSING 297.283); Green, A. (2007). Continuing the legacy: 30 years of the Mosque Building Fund in Singapore. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, p. 86. (Call no.: RSING 297.355957 GRE)
35. Muhammad Sayyid Tantawi. (2006). Transcript of inaugural MUIS lecture distinguished visitors programme, 26 May 2006, Ritz Carlton, Singapore. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (Call no.: RSING 297 TAN); Feisal Abdul Rauf. (2010). Forging a common humanity. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (Call no.: RSING 297.283); Armstrong, K. (2007). The role of religion in the new millennium. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (Call no.: RSING 297 ARM)
36. Zakir Hussain. (2006, September 26). Muis in US tie-up to boost faith dialogue. The Straits Times, p. H5. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Majlis Ugama Islam Singapore. (2005). MUIS annual report 2005 (p. 104). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from MUIS website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/documents/Annual_Reports/ar2005_all.pdf
37. Muslim Law Bill is passed in parliament. (1966, August 18). The Straits Times, p. 8. Retrieved from NewspaperSG; Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, p. 22. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
38. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 30, 138. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
39. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 40, 138. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957); Zainul Abidin Rasheed & Norshahril Saat. (Eds.). (2016). Majulah!: 50 years of Malay/Muslim community in Singapore. Singapore: World Scientific, p. 212. (Call no.: RSING 305.697095957 MAJ)
40. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 40, 59, 64, 71, 74, 78, 98, 122, 138–139. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
41. And the winners are… (2002, November 28). Today, p. 78. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
42. Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 100, 139. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
43. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapore. (2005). MUIS annual report 2005 [CD-ROM]. Singapore: MUIS, p. 22. (Call no.: RCLOS 297.65095957 SMRADA-[AR]); Zakir Hussain. (2005, December 29). Islamic religious teachers to be registered. The Straits Times, p. 1. Retrieved from NewspaperSG.
44. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2006). MUIS annual report 2006 [CD-ROM]. Singapore: MUIS, pp. 11, 35. (Call no.: RU RSING 297.65095957 SMRADA-[AR]); Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, pp. 94, 140. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
45. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2007). MUIS annual report 2007 (p. 3). Retrieved 2016, August 3 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website:  http://www.muis.gov.sg/documents/Annual_Reports/ar2007_fullver.pdf; Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, p. 140. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
46. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2008). MUIS annual report 2008. Singapore:  MUIS, pp. 22–24. (Call no.: RCLOS 297.65095957 MUISAR); Green, A. (2009). Honouring the past, shaping the future: The MUIS story: 40 years of building a Singapore Muslim community of excellence. Singapore: Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, p. 140. (Call no.: RSING 297.65095957)
47. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2009). MUIS annual report 2009 [CD-ROM]. Singapore: MUIS, p. 7. (Call no.: RCLOS 297.65095957 SMRADA-[AR])
48. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2010). MUIS annual report 2010. Singapore: MUIS, p. 16. Available via PublicationSG.
49. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2010). MUIS annual report 2010. Singapore: MUIS, p. 4. Available via PublicationSG; Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2011). MUIS annual report 2011 (p. 11). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/documents/Annual_Reports/v16_MUIS_AR_Ed_14_JUN_2011.pdf
50. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2012). MUIS annual report 2012 (p. 6). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/documents/Annual_Reports/MUIS%20AR12.pdf; Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2013). MUIS annual report 2013 (p. 20). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/documents/Annual_Reports/Annual%20Report_Full_2013.pdf
51. Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura. (2013). MUIS annual report 2013 (p. 6). Retrieved 2016, November 5 from Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura website: http://www.muis.gov.sg/documents/Annual_Reports/Annual%20Report_Full_2013.pdf


The information in this article is valid as at 2013 and correct as far as we are able to ascertain from our sources. It is not intended to be an exhaustive or complete history of the subject. Please contact the Library for further reading materials on the topic. 

Subject
Philosophy, psychology and religion>>Religion>>Islam
Muslims--Singapore
Religious institutions--Singapore
Organisations